Staff training & awareness

Your organization's entire staff needs to be made aware of the need for accessible technologies as part of creating an inclusive workplace. Beyond this, your initiative may want to develop role-based training, and may even want to develop your own training materials.

A white man stands wearing a VR headset and using a hand-held controller. At his side, a sighted white male companion holds a white cane.
 Man stands wearing a VR headset and using a hand-held controller, next to another man.

Throughout 2020, PEAT is exploring the role that technology can play in breaking down barriers to employment and ensuring accessibility, equality, and opportunity for all. Please join us!

This Action Steps toolkit is designed to help employers learn the what, why, and how of accessible workplace technology. 

For some, conducting business from home may be a new adventure, while others are veterans of remote work. Regardless of experience, it can be helpful for us all to think through approaches to teleworking to ensure that we are both effective and content when working from our home offices.

Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) are an important part of a company’s diversity and inclusion efforts. But how do you ensure your ERG meetings and events are accessible to everyone? Check out this tipsheet of strategies from PEAT and the Employer Assistance and Resource Network on Disability Inclusion (EARN).

If you're eager for a high-skilled, high-paying career, check out the Department of Labor's Apprenticeship Finder as well as the Apprenti website to get started.

Tips to help you ensure that your social media posts are accessible to everyone.

It's important to know—and be able to prove—that your activities are having a positive effect. PEAT offers several resources to help you measure and evaluate your progress

Find resources to get started with training staff across your organization in the accessibility skills relevant to their specific roles.

Different job roles within your company will require different training levels and skills. This article discusses some typical job roles and the accessibility training they should ideally receive.

People with various permanent, temporary, situational, or changing disabilities access the web in different ways. Check out the following tips to ensure that everyone can use your website—regardless of whether they can manipulate a mouse, their level of vision, how many colors they can see, how much they can hear, or how they process information.