Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

A white man stands wearing a VR headset and using a hand-held controller. At his side, a sighted white male companion holds a white cane.
 Man stands wearing a VR headset and using a hand-held controller, next to another man.

Throughout 2020, PEAT is exploring the role that technology can play in breaking down barriers to employment and ensuring accessibility, equality, and opportunity for all. Please join us!

As of February 2020, the Department of Justice (DOJ) entered into 175 settlement agreements addressing how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to ICT accessibility. Through these agreements, employers and other covered entities can understand DOJ priorities related to website and ICT accessibility and how to proactively comply with existing rules and guidance.

The Department of Justice (DOJ) recently released a significant statement clarifying that digital accessibility is covered by the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Bobby Silverstein discusses the implications of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other laws related to accessible technology with respect to shifts to a gig or project-based workforce.

As part of our Future of Work series, PEAT has been exploring how coming technology and policy trends may impact people with disabilities at work. The following interview explores the growing gig or freelance economy.

Bobby Silverstein of Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville, PC provided PEAT with background information that he compiled for an interview with us about the policy implications for people with disabilities participating in the gig economy.

Employers and other entities covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act and Title V of the Rehabilitation Act can add the following procurement language to contracts with product vendors to enhance the accessibility of purchased or licensed products.

The ADA is a comprehensive civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability and ensures equal opportunity for persons with disabilities—including Internet Web site access, mobile applications, and other forms of ICT

The regulations for implementing Titles II and III of the ADA include “defenses”—circumstances in which the covered entity is not required to provide specified services.

Must employers make web-based employment information and services accessible to everyone, including those with disabilities? Bobby Silverstein discusses how the ADA applies to accessible workplace technology.