Diversity Equity Inclusion and Accessibility (DEIA)

Digital Equity and the Disability Ecosystem: Finding Local, Regional, and National Connections

People with disabilities are part of diverse communities that benefit from equitable access to broadband internet. As State Digital Equity Plans help more people get connected, it is vital to center disabled people in the process. These Plans should include the needs and perspectives of people with disabilities to ensure that new broadband investments help close the digital divide. The resources listed below can help State Digital Equity Plan creators and implementors engage with organizations that empower people with disabilities to live, work, and participate in their communities.

2024-02-08T18:46:47+00:00Published: January 29th, 2024|Tags: , |

Podcast: Ethics, Equity, & Inclusion in Emerging Technologies

Noble Ackerson, Director of Product for AIML with Ventera Corporation and President of the CyberXR Coalition, discusses the need for diverse and inclusive extended reality (XR) and shares his perspective on artificial intelligence (AI) ethics. He also gives guidance on AI-enabled hiring tools and bias mitigation. […]

Spotlight on Digital Equity

At PEAT, we are passionate about ensuring that workers across the country have access to the digital tools they need to succeed. Digital tools at work include everything from strong broadband connections to artificial intelligence (AI) that reduces bias in the hiring process. […]

Podcast: Bringing Authentic Inclusion into Today’s Digital & Physical Workplaces

Zariah Cameron, Equity Centered UX strategist at Ally, shares how critical it is to embrace authentic inclusion in all aspects of work. She discusses how you can make your digital and physical workplaces more inclusive and more equitable by paying attention to the details such as inclusive alt text, mental health programs, and more. [...]

Surveillance and Remote Work

Some employers report using surveillance tools because they fear that remote work lowers productivity. However, research consistently shows the opposite is true. The International Workplace Group found that 85% of businesses reported that offering remote options made their businesses more productive—with 67% estimating that it improved productivity by at least one-fifth.

Key Takeaways for Employers

Employers should exercise strong caution when using automated surveillance tools. They should develop best practices that limit surveillance through intentional centralized governance procedures that prioritize inclusion for people with disabilities and other underrepresented groups. Aside from legal compliance concerns, automated workplace surveillance could result in harmful organizational cultures and other undesirable outcomes.