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    Find resources to get started with training staff across your organization in the accessibility skills relevant to their specific roles.

    Self-driving cars show exciting promise to address existing barriers for people with disabilities traveling to and from work—as long as developers incorporate accessibility into these technologies from the start.

    On January 17, the PEAT Think Tank held an in-person meeting with leadership from the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP). Based on an in-depth analysis of insights gathered at the meeting, PEAT has distilled a set of potential action steps that PEAT, DOL, and other organizations can use to prioritize emerging and prospective efforts around advancing accessible technology and employment.

    The world of work is changing. As many as 1 in 5 workers now make up the “gig economy,” and technologies such as live video, artificial intelligence (AI) and virtual reality (VR) are entering the workplace. This series of podcasts and related resources explores how these emerging trends are impacting people with disabilities.

    People with various permanent, temporary, situational, or changing disabilities access the web in different ways. Check out the following tips to ensure that everyone can use your website—regardless of whether they can manipulate a mouse, their level of vision, how many colors they can see, how much they can hear, or how they process information.

    In FY 2013, the Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) launched the Partnership on Employment & Accessible Technology (PEAT). Through FY 2018, PEAT has served as the leading national resource to promote policy action and collaboration to increase the development and adoption of accessible workplace technology.

    PEAT is partnering with Apprenti to build bridges between the technology industry and inclusive apprenticeship programs. Combining classroom instruction with on-the-job training, apprenticeship programs can help companies quickly bring new and more diverse talent into the workplace—including people with disabilities.

    Tech companies are currently struggling to fill job openings because not enough prospective employees have accessible technology skills—and their products are less accessible as a result. Check out PEAT's latest research, and the actions we're taking to close the gap.

    The Partnership on Employment & Accessible Technology (PEAT) is a multi-faceted initiative to foster collaboration and action around accessible technology in the workplace. Guided by a consortium of policy and technology leaders, PEAT works to help employers, IT companies, and others to understand why it pays to build and buy accessible technology, and how to do so.

    PEAT webinars are always free (preregistration required). If you miss the live event, the archived video, transcript, and presentation slides will be posted approximately 1-2 weeks following the event date.

     

    Different job roles within your company will require different training levels and skills. This article discusses some typical job roles and the accessibility training they should ideally receive.

    The following resources explore how you can weave accessibility and inclusion into your organizational culture.

    Check out PEAT’s latest infographic to explore the roles and responsibilities that different entities hold in the world of accessible workplace technology.

    Lainey Feingold is a nationally-recognized disability rights lawyer known for negotiating landmark accessibility agreements and pioneering the collaborative advocacy and dispute resolution method known as “Structured Negotiations.” PEAT recently spoke with Feingold about her work around digital accessibility and its impact on the employment of people with disabilities.

    This 2010 law is the source of several new regulations aimed at addressing telecommunications accessibility in the digital age.

    Event Date: 
    July 21, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm EDT

    Must employers make web-based employment information and services accessible to everyone, including those with disabilities? Bobby Silverstein discusses how the ADA applies to accessible workplace technology.

    The ADA is a comprehensive civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability and ensures equal opportunity for persons with disabilities—including Internet Web site access, mobile applications, and other forms of ICT

    The EEOC's April 2016 Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding its proposed updates to Section 501 includes many implications related to accessible technology and employment.