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    Keeping with tradition, this year's conference delivered another robust line-up of educational sessions highlighting worldwide efforts to make technology more accessible to people with disabilities.

    PEAT recently chatted with Drew LaHart, Program Director for Accessibility Competency and Enablement of IBM Accessibility Research, and Jenny Lay-Flurrie, Chief Accessibility Officer of Microsoft, to learn how their companies are approaching accessibility today and what they predict for the future.

    PEAT’s work to foster collaboration and action around accessibility in the workplace would not be possible without contributions from the strong global community that supports us, comprised of accessibility experts, employers, government entities, disability advocates, and others. In celebration of GAAD, here's a list of some of our favorite actionable quotes from our contributors. 

    This year’s Accessibility Hack at the Web For All (W4A) Conference demonstrated that collaboration from diverse backgrounds pays big dividends when it comes to accessibility—and that developers can often make easy changes that make a big difference for end users, even when retrofitting a product.

    Right out of the gate, this year's M-Enabling Summit had us thinking about our mission in a brand-new way, with an emphasis on one surprising word: octopus.    

    For those who follow the world of web accessibility, this year brought a big development—the first public draft of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (

    People with disabilities are propelling technology to become more accessible—which in turn is driving innovative breakthroughs from both companies and the people with disabilities who work at them.

    This year's USBLN conference focused on “Disability: A Catalyst for Innovation" and showcased accessible technology’s role in fostering business success.

    While jobs in the technology industry have grown exponentially, they’re not always accessible to  applicants with disabilities—and Ather Sharif is on a mission to change that.

    This new video explores the connection between the six phases of employment and where accessible IT comes into play.

    At this year's Coleman Conference on Cognitive Disability and Technology, PEAT had the opportunity to learn from experts working on the latest research on technology for people with cognitive disabilities, and to share with attendees the work we do around public policy and accessible workplace technology.

    What does the future hold for accessible IT? Federal and industry executives from across the technology sector recently joined PEAT, supported by the General Services Administration (GSA), to share experiences, learn from each other, and discuss the future of accessible IT.  

    The Campaign for Disability Employment (CDE) recently announced the launch of its brand-new website. It offers in-depth information and coordinating media products to promote positive employment outcomes for people with disabilities, including the award-winning “I Can,” “Because” and “Who I Am” PSAs.

    The Campaign for Disability Employment (CDE) recently announced the launch of its brand-new website. It offers in-depth information and coordinating media products to promote positive employment outcomes for people with disabilities, including the award-winning “I Can,” “Because” and “Who I Am” PSAs.​

    Here at PEAT, we spend a lot of time talking about the importance of accessible technology in the workplace. But how do we ensure that budding computer engineers and programmers have the skills they need to develop accessible tech in the first place?

    PEAT's 2017 Think Tank meeting explored key issues related to accessible workplace technology through working groups and rich facilitated discussions with 63 participants representing industry, government, academia, and the disability community. The event generated several tangible recommendations for closing the accessible technology skills gap, expanding government apprenticeship and workforce programs for people with disabilities, and encouraging the development of accessible products.

    Salimah LaForce explains how people with disabilities can help make wireless technologies more accessible by participating in the latest release of the Wireless RERC’s Survey of User Needs (SUN). First launched in 2001, this cornerstone survey provides essential data to engineers, designers, the wireless industry, and government regulators to help make wireless technology more accessible.

     

    Our team joined thousands of accessibility enthusiasts from around the globe at the annual CSUN Assistive Technology Conference last month to exchange insights about the progress of accessibility efforts in technology and business, and to learn what is in store for the future.

    Teach Access recently drew students to Silicon Valley for their inaugural Study Away program, where students met with leading companies to learn the value of an accessible technology skill set on the job market—and how it will help them make a real impact on ALL users.

    Brooke Aiken details the new features and tools recently launched at Section508.gov, the federal government’s website for IT accessibility. While aimed primarily at federal employees and contractors, these tools are broadly useful for anyone seeking to ensure that the technology they are buying is accessible.