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    Robert "Bobby" Silverstein, one of the behind-the-scenes architects of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), reflects upon how the ADA is now increasingly playing a critical role in ensuring equal employment opportunities for people with disabilities by ensuring the accessibility of information and communication technologies (ICT).

    Powers Pyles Sutter and Verville principal Bobby Silverstein details the various accessibility policies and how companies can strategize to make this part of their company culture.

    The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is seeking public comments on their proposed updates to Section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act. 

    DOJ is looking at establishing accessibility requirements for online services, programs, and activities provided to the public by state and local governments—including many employment-related tools and resources. 

    When the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law in 1990, much of the technology currently used in workplace did not yet exist. In honor of the ADA's 26th anniversary, legal expert Bobby Silverstein recently sat down with PEAT for an in-depth Q&A exploring how the ADA applies to workplace ICT, and how recent settlements are impacting this issue.

    The Department of Justice is requesting approval to research the benefits of accessible web content for people who are blind—including websites and ICT that are essential in most workplaces today. These results would inform future rulemaking under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), including the ADA's application to accessible workplace technology.

    PEAT encourages public comments from stakeholders committed to accessible technology in the workplace in order to help assess the need for this research, and best practices for gathering the information. You can submit comments until August 30, 2016

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was written in 1990—long before the proliferation of the Internet and today's technologies. In this recorded webinar, one of the architects of the ADA, Bobby Silverstein, discusses his perspective on the development of the ADA and its application today to accessible workplace technology.

    Section 255 requires manufacturers to ensure that telecommunications equipment and services are designed, developed, and fabricated to be accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities, when it is readily achievable to do so.

    In January 2017, the U.S. Access Board published updates to two important regulations: Section 508 and Section 255.

    People with cognitive disabilities have an equal right to technology and information access. Learn more about this official statement by a coalition of disability organizations and individuals, and how interested parties can sign on to endorse it.

    This fact sheet offers AJCs an “at-a-glance” overview of the tech-related implications of WIOA, and where to find assistance in meeting accessible ICT responsibilities.

    AJCs can use this handy one-pager to reference ICT accessibility best practices related to websites, online systems, and other tools.

    Salimah LaForce explains how people with disabilities can help make wireless technologies more accessible by participating in the latest release of the Wireless RERC’s Survey of User Needs (SUN). First launched in 2001, this cornerstone survey provides essential data to engineers, designers, the wireless industry, and government regulators to help make wireless technology more accessible.

     

    As of May 2016, the Department of Justice (DOJ) entered into 171 settlement agreements addressing how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to ICT accessibility. Through these agreements, employers and other covered entities can understand DOJ priorities related to website and ICT accessibility and how to proactively comply with existing rules and guidance.

    The National Council on Disability’s 2016 report to Congress notably recognizes accessible workplace technology as a right for all Americans and a key pathway to employment, and provides actionable recommendations for the federal government, technology industry, and private and public sectors.

    The Department of Justice (DOJ) recently released a significant statement clarifying that digital accessibility is covered by the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

    The Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University is conducting a survey to examine considerations for workplace technology use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The deadline is June 30, 2019.

    Lainey Feingold is a nationally-recognized disability rights lawyer known for negotiating landmark accessibility agreements and pioneering the collaborative advocacy and dispute resolution method known as “Structured Negotiations.” PEAT recently spoke with Feingold about her work around digital accessibility and its impact on the employment of people with disabilities.