Resource Library

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Check out PEAT’s takeaways from a recent workshop hosted by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) that explored strategies for aligning XR platforms with inclusive design principles.

The International Association of Accessibility Professionals (IAAP) is seeking your input on a new study to guide the development of the certification of Procurement Specialist in Accessibility. The survey will close on December 31, 2019.

HR Tech is one of the top global events showcasing emerging technologies and tools transforming the human relations (HR) industry. This year, platforms utilizing artificial intelligence (AI) continued to trend, with new focus on mitigating bias and ensuring that AI tools can align with corporate goals for diverse and inclusive hiring.

The recent MAVRIC conference showcased momentum for using X-Reality (XR) to improve people's lives, including people with disabilities.

The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is currently seeking feedback about whether drivers should have the ability to choose between a pre-set list of sounds that alert pedestrians to the presence of electric and hybrid cars when traveling at low speeds. The notice of proposed rulemaking also asks whether NHTSA should impose limits on the number of sounds that manufacturers may install.

Ph.D. student Ather Sharif recounts how this year's Teach Access Study Away program in Silicon Valley connected participants to the skills, knowledge, and networking contacts needed to build accessible technologies for the future.

This year’s expanded 2-day Accessibility Hackathon at the Web for All (W4A) Conference in San Francisco advanced workplace inclusion for people with disabilities by enhancing web-based tools such as Jupyter Notebooks with an accessibility mindset.

In FY 2013, the Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) launched the Partnership on Employment & Accessible Technology (PEAT). Through FY 2018, PEAT has served as the leading national resource to promote policy action and collaboration to increase the development and adoption of accessible workplace technology.

On January 17, the PEAT Think Tank held an in-person meeting with leadership from the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP). Based on an in-depth analysis of insights gathered at the meeting, PEAT has distilled a set of potential action steps that PEAT, DOL, and other organizations can use to prioritize emerging and prospective efforts around advancing accessible technology and employment.

This year's CSUN Assistive Technology Conference highlighted the sharp rise of artificial intelligence (AI) into everyday life, charting both the challenges and great potential that AI holds from an accessibility perspective.

The Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University is conducting a survey to examine considerations for workplace technology use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The deadline is June 30, 2019.

By prioritizing accessibility here and now, CES 2019 highlighted how next-generation technology can transform the workforce and make it more inclusive for people with disabilities (PWD).

The Department of Justice (DOJ) recently released a significant statement clarifying that digital accessibility is covered by the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Check out PEAT’s inside look on the 2018 ICT Accessibility Testing Symposium, and how one student is changing the face of web accessibility in the nonprofit sector.

Tips to help you ensure that your social media posts are accessible to everyone.

Tech companies are currently struggling to fill job openings because not enough prospective employees have accessible technology skills—and their products are less accessible as a result. Check out PEAT's latest research, and the actions we're taking to close the gap.

Different job roles within your company will require different training levels and skills. This article discusses some typical job roles and the accessibility training they should ideally receive.

People with various permanent, temporary, situational, or changing disabilities access the web in different ways. Check out the following tips to ensure that everyone can use your website—regardless of whether they can manipulate a mouse, their level of vision, how many colors they can see, how much they can hear, or how they process information.

PEAT's 2017 Think Tank meeting explored key issues related to accessible workplace technology through working groups and rich facilitated discussions. The event generated several tangible recommendations for closing the accessible technology skills gap, expanding government apprenticeship and workforce programs for people with disabilities, and encouraging the development of accessible products.

Many accessibility consultants are available for hire to help build and fix accessibility issues, and to provide staff trainings.

As you build and refine your accessible technology initiative, you can find additional training resources and support for yourself and staff through the following professional development resources.

Resources for getting started with web accessibility. While the average employee doesn’t need to know the nuts and bolts of web accessibility, you’ll want to ensure that anyone involved with the website understands how to upload accessible content.

 

As part of our Future of Work series, PEAT has been exploring how coming technology and policy trends may impact people with disabilities at work. The following interview explores the growing gig or freelance economy.

Bobby Silverstein of Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville, PC provided PEAT with background information that he compiled for an interview with us about the policy implications for people with disabilities participating in the gig economy.

After reviewing the responses to your RFI, you’ll be better prepared to define the accessibility requirements for your formal procurement solicitation.

Before issuing a solicitation it is crucial to determine whether the marketplace already houses accessible versions of the products you want to buy. 

While jobs in the technology industry have grown exponentially, they’re not always accessible to applicants with disabilities—and Ather Sharif is on a mission to change that.

Designed for internal staff presentations within AJCs, this ready-to-share presentation deck is a perfect tool to train staff on WIOA and accessible technology best practices

For those who follow the world of web accessibility, this year brought a big development—the first public draft of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1.

Global accessibility leaders identified key strategies of making workplace technology accessible at this year’s Web for All Conference (W4A), which focused on “The Future of Accessible Work.” 

This year’s Accessibility Hack at the Web For All (W4A) Conference demonstrated that collaboration from diverse backgrounds pays big dividends when it comes to accessibility—and that developers can often make easy changes that make a big difference for end users, even when retrofitting a product.

PEAT’s work to foster collaboration and action around accessibility in the workplace would not be possible without contributions from the strong global community that supports us, comprised of accessibility experts, employers, government entities, disability advocates, and others. In celebration of GAAD, here's a list of some of our favorite actionable quotes from our contributors. 

Self-driving cars show exciting promise to address existing barriers for people with disabilities traveling to and from work—as long as developers incorporate accessibility into these technologies from the start.

By 2020, experts predict that 82% of consumer web traffic will be video. This factsheet on producing accessible videos will help ensure that your videos reach a full audience.

The annual HR Technology Conference is always an essential event for PEAT, given their focus on technology tools and trends shaping the field of human resources. This year we left feeling more excited and energized than ever, because the topic of accessibility is finally starting to take hold in the hearts and minds of HR Tech stakeholders.

This 2010 law is the source of several new regulations aimed at addressing telecommunications accessibility in the digital age.

The Rehab Act is designed to safeguard the civil rights of people with disabilities, and includes many regulations related to technology.

The ADA is a comprehensive civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability and ensures equal opportunity for persons with disabilities—including Internet Web site access, mobile applications, and other forms of ICT

Perkins School for the Blind and Harvard Extension School have partnered to provide a free online course titled “Introduction to Inclusive Talent Acquisition” for hiring managers and recruiters.

It’s no surprise that a team effort is essential for providing accessibility professionals with a strong network of professional support, and in our August PEAT Talk, Rob Sinclair discussed how the recent merger of IAAP and G3ict will promote and support the accessibility profession on a more global scale.

Last month’s M-Enabling Summit brought international leaders together from a range of fields connected to the promotion and advancement of accessible mobile applications—and allowed PEAT to advance key actions related to accessible technology issues impacting employment though a policy roundtable and a panel discussion.

Ben Caldwell reports on the successes of the recent WWW+W4A Hackathon hosted by PEAT and Google Montreal to make H5P (a popular web-based product used widely in workplaces and schools) more accessible. 

One of the great promises of technology is that it can, and should, open the doors for people with disabilities to participate in the workplace by eliminating barriers. But when Deque web accessibility consultant and strategist Denis Boudreau investigated the basic accessibility of five top job hunting sites, the results were grim.

Deputy Secretary of Labor Chris Lu discusses his takeaways from meeting with the great Stevie Wonder and hundreds of other dedicated leading accessibility "stars" at last month's International Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference (CSUN). 

While new technologies have broken down countless barriers for individuals with disabilities, job hunting online continues to be fraught with accessibility-related obstacles that the general population may not even realize exist. And as GettingHired's Gabrielle Nagle discusses, inaccessible eRecruiting doesn’t just affect the job seeker, but also the employer.

As businesses compete to attract talented, skilled employees, it’s important to make sure that artificial barriers aren’t blocking their path. In this cautionary tale, Sassy Outwater explains how employers may be missing out on top candidates when their online hiring and recruiting systems aren't accessible.

The terms “accessibility” and “universal design” are often used together these days. But what is actually meant by these two terms? Sina Bahram, a digital accessibility expert, broke it down for us at our January PEAT Talk.

If you're one of the cutting-edge employers using pre-employment tests to screen potential hires, have you stopped to consider whether those tests are accessible to all applicants? It's an important question that speaks to both equal employment opportunity, and your capacity to cast the widest net possible when fishing for talent.

Online hiring practices have made it increasingly easy to apply for a job—unless you’re a person with a disability, that is. Senior Web Accessibility Consultant Denis Boudreau explores the problem of why the employment rate of Americans with disabilities has continued to drop for the last 25 years, and how web designers and developers hold a key to improving the situation.

For several members of the PEAT team, October was a busy month of travel, talk, and trend spotting as we headed west to attend three conferences: the Coleman Institute on Cognitive Disabilities Annual Conference; HR Technology Conference and Expo (HR Tech); and the International Association of Accessibility Professionals (IAAP) Access 2015. All presented valuable opportunities for our team to learn, share knowledge, examine future trends, and identify ways to strengthen PEAT's work.

When buying a piece of eRecruiting technology, employers and human resources professionals can often feel like they're at the mercy of the vendors who are selling or building the technology. This tip sheet explores techniques for communicating about accessibility—clearly, directly, and throughout the technology development lifecycle.

In today’s business world, eRecruiting tools are everywhere. As these tools become more and more commonplace, employers are asking important questions about the legal responsibilities they may have to make those tools accessible to all users, including job seekers with disabilities.

This tip sheet describes some common accessibility issues faced by people with several types of disabilities—including those affecting vision, hearing, physical, and cognitive skills. It highlights tips and exemplary practices that HR professionals can share with the technology designers and developers who are purchasing, building, modifying, and improving their eRecruiting tools, websites, and mobile applications.

Despite all of the advances in technology, employers are still having trouble filling positions. Of course, there are a number of reasons why finding talent is so difficult. But what if one of those boiled down to a fundamental problem with the technology tools employers are using? What if top talent is falling through the cracks due to accessibility issues, rather than a lack of qualifications?

No matter your industry, the technological tools we use to accomplish our work today are more advanced than the tools we used even just a few years ago, and this is especially true for people with disabilities. New technologies are fundamentally changing the workplace, and rapidly evolving technologies and workplace policies both play into a new way of doing business.

CLOSED: On February 27, 2015, the U.S. Access Board published a proposed update to the rules implementing Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, which outlines the federal standards and guidelines for making information and communications technology (ICT) accessible to people with disabilities. The public comment period closed on May 28, 2015.

If you‘ll be attending CSUN, we hope you’ll join PEAT for A Fresh Look at Accessibility and Online Job Applications. During this session, Joiwind Ronen and Josh Christianson will share PEAT’s research findings on this critical topic. 

As a senior vice president and information technology manager at Wells Fargo, I frequently received the question, "Can the company buy me a...?"  For those few people who were able to articulate the worth to the bank and the productivity benefits it would bring, I was eager to help, and usually we were successful.

An introductory blog post officially announcing the launch of PEATworks.org, an interactive online resource focused on accessible technology in the workplace.

As you develop and implement your accessibility initiative, it's important to know—and be able to prove—that your activities are having a positive effect.