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When growing an accessible workplace technology effort, it can be daunting to efficiently address gaps in your knowledge base. However, you don't have to do it alone. Eliza Greenwood recently attended the annual AccessU conference to improve her own skills, and reports that the opportunity to practice digital accessibility "hands on" in computer labs made a big difference.

What's the key to understanding how accessible your products are? A good testing process.

PEAT Deputy Project Director Corinne Weible answers the common question of “What is the difference between accessible technology and assistive technology?”

Of course any initiative you undertake boils down to the return on investment, and accessibility should be no exception. Thankfully, purchasing and using accessible technology—including accessible eRecruiting tools—can benefit your organization immensely. Read on to learn how...

TalentWorks is a free online tool for employers and human resources professionals that helps them ensure their online job applications and other eRecruiting technologies are accessible to job seekers with disabilities. PEAT created the tool based on its national survey of people with disabilities, where 46% of respondents rated their last experience applying for a job online as "difficult to impossible."

This article provides tips on accessible technology training—from basic disability awareness for all employees, to highly specialized technical training for software and application developers. 

Newly founded last year, the International Association of Accessibility Professionals (IAAP) already has 1,700 members in 50 countries. The mission of the organization is to define, promote, and improve the accessibility profession globally through networking, education, and certification in order to enable the creation of accessible products, contents, and services. PEAT recently had a conversation with IAAP’s board president, Rob Sinclair, who also has a little day job as Microsoft’s Chief Accessibility Officer, and Chris Peck, IAAP Chief Executive Officer, to find out how they are tackling such a global endeavor.

Headquartered in Washington, D.C., CTIAThe Wireless Association® represents the wireless communications industry and has a history of leadership on mobile accessibility issues.

We recently spoke with CTIA's Matthew Gerst, director of state regulatory & external affairs, about CTIA's work in this area.

Looking for a roadmap to ensure that the technology in your workplace is accessible to all employees and job seekers?  You've come to the right place!  This Action Steps toolkit is designed to help employers learn the what, why, and how of accessible workplace technology. 

Technology is essential to applying for a job, getting a job, and doing a job. And as long as it's accessible, it can be a great equalizer in ensuring that people with disabilities can obtain, retain, and advance in employment. To optimize their potential, individuals with disabilities should have a basic understanding of what accessible workplace technology is—and use this knowledge to assess and meet their own needs.

Once your company commits to increasing the accessibility of its workplace technology, it is smart to communicate that commitment, both internally and externally.

 
 

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Employers with strong, mature accessibility initiatives usually have support from the top—executives and other leaders who communicate their commitment to an information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure that is inclusive of people with disabilities throughout the organization.But what type of executive should spearhead your initiative? And how can you, as an internal accessibility advocate, recruit such a leader? PEAT suggests three easy action steps to get you on the right path.

To ensure their products are accessible to the widest range of people—including people with disabilities—many technology providers implement internal initiatives focused specifically on information and communications technology (ICT) accessibility. To be successful, such an initiative must be guided by a well-rounded team of committed individuals, each bringing specific skills and resources to the table.

Once developed, a solid, comprehensive business case can serve as an important tool in justifying your company's accessibility initiative and communicating about it, both internally and externally.