Resource Library

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The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is currently seeking feedback about whether drivers should have the ability to choose between a pre-set list of sounds that alert pedestrians to the presence of electric and hybrid cars when traveling at low speeds. The notice of proposed rulemaking also asks whether NHTSA should impose limits on the number of sounds that manufacturers may install.

In celebration of the 29th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Frances West joined PEAT to discuss how companies can use inclusion in their business to drive disruptive innovation. Frances formerly served as IBM’s first Chief Accessibility Officer and is the founder of FrancesWestCo.

Dan Nichols discusses how Candidit is using artificial intelligence to built a hiring platform based around inclusive talent competencies to reduce bias and better match employers to candidates with the specific skills they need.

Doug Schepers discusses sonification and other innovative methods of making charts, graphs, and maps more interactive and accessible to all users, including people with disabilities.

Jim Fruchterman discusses Benetech’s research on expanding employment success for people with disabilities, and how inclusive hiring and accessible technology intersect with Silicon Valley’s push to drive innovation.

Amitai Bin-Nun, Vice President of Autonomous Vehicles and Mobility Innovation at Securing America's Future Energy (SAFE), discusses the factors that autonomous vehicle manufacturers need to consider from an inclusive design standpoint, and the potential this technology holds to bring new talent into the workforce.

Megan Lawrence and Laura Ruby discuss how and why Microsoft is partnering with the Smart Cities for All initiative to eliminate the digital divide for persons with disabilities in cities around the world.

Neil Milliken, global head of accessibility and inclusion at Atos, discusses how apprenticeship programs are helping Atos quickly bring in new and more diverse talent with the in-demand accessible technology skills they need.

Jennifer Carlson, Executive Director of Apprenti, discusses how their program works with employers to quickly fill STEM positions with new and more diverse talent through inclusive apprenticeships.

Tips to help you ensure that your social media posts are accessible to everyone.

Henry Claypool, policy consultant for the American Association of People with Disabilities, discusses the potential impacts that autonomous vehicles may have in the workplace and other areas of life.

Beth Crutchfield and Jessie Haugh of Level Access discuss the accessibility issues that HR and workplace leaders should consider when using virtual and augmented reality as part of their hiring, recruiting, and retention processes.

Dan Ellerman, Inclusion and Diversity Senior Manager at Accenture, discusses the findings from their recent white paper "Amplify Accessibility," and the hows and whys of implementing the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).

Sassy Outwater-Wright, Director of the Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired (MABVI), discusses why businesses should hire people with disabilities, and what it's like for jobseekers to encounter eRecruiting and HR technologies that aren't accessible.

Larry Goldberg of Verizon Media and Kate Sonka of Michigan State University discuss how the Teach Access collaborative is helping leading tech companies and universities partner to ensure that the next generation of tech developers and designers learn to think and build inclusively. 

Jeff Bigham of Carnegie Mellon University discusses how computer scientists rely on crowdsourced testing to make technologies more accessible, and how the flexibility of crowd work intersects with growing opportunities in the gig economy for people with disabilities.

Researcher Martez Mott is working to create new touch interaction techniques for mobile technologies using machine-based learning. In this episode, he explains how this emerging technology will improve workplace technology with touch screens by allowing users with a range of motor abilities to customize their touch techniques.

Scott Wiseman and Joe Bielawski discuss how the gig economy is helping the government to staff up, push projects forward, and increase efficiency—and the opportunities this may offer to job seekers with disabilities.

Any digital content your company distributes, either internally or externally, needs to be accessible. This article covers training resources for many popular workplace products.

Bobby Silverstein discusses the implications of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other laws related to accessible technology with respect to shifts to a gig or project-based workforce.

Jutta Treviranus, Director and Founder of the Inclusive Design Research Centre, discusses how to improve artificial intelligence systems so they can better serve everyone, including people with disabilities.

Cisco's Project Lifechanger started out as a volunteer pilot program, and is now helping to transform the company's hiring and employment programs. 

As part of our Future of Work series, PEAT has been exploring how coming technology and policy trends may impact people with disabilities at work. The following interview explores the growing gig or freelance economy.

In this short video, Bobby Silverstein provides an overview of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).

This short video describes the origins and goals of TalentWorks and invites you to join the conversation.

As businesses compete to attract talented, skilled employees, it’s important to make sure that artificial barriers aren’t blocking their path. In this cautionary tale, Sassy Outwater explains how employers may be missing out on top candidates when their online hiring and recruiting systems aren't accessible.

Online hiring practices have made it increasingly easy to apply for a job—unless you’re a person with a disability, that is. Senior Web Accessibility Consultant Denis Boudreau explores the problem of why the employment rate of Americans with disabilities has continued to drop for the last 25 years, and how web designers and developers hold a key to improving the situation.

What's the key to understanding how accessible your products are? A good testing process.

More and more employers are using social media platforms like Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter to advertise job postings and promote their companies, while job seekers are using them to network, learn about career opportunities, and apply for jobs online. But not all social media content is accessible to all people, which limits the reach and effectiveness of these platforms.

This tip sheet describes some common accessibility issues faced by people with several types of disabilities—including those affecting vision, hearing, physical, and cognitive skills. It highlights tips and exemplary practices that HR professionals can share with the technology designers and developers who are purchasing, building, modifying, and improving their eRecruiting tools, websites, and mobile applications.

Despite all of the advances in technology, employers are still having trouble filling positions. Of course, there are a number of reasons why finding talent is so difficult. But what if one of those boiled down to a fundamental problem with the technology tools employers are using? What if top talent is falling through the cracks due to accessibility issues, rather than a lack of qualifications?

Finding good employees is not what it used to be. Instead of candidates mailing or dropping off hard copy resumes to your place of business, most candidates today discover job openings through online searches. It's a trend that is benefiting employers and job seekers alike.

Some know it as "pre-employment." Others simply call it "recruiting and interviewing." Whatever the label, we're all referring to the first stage of the employment lifecycle. And that, of course, is the focus of this tool.

This article provides tips on accessible technology training—from basic disability awareness for all employees, to highly specialized technical training for software and application developers. 

Once your company commits to increasing the accessibility of its workplace technology, it is smart to communicate that commitment, both internally and externally.

 
 

Once developed, a solid, comprehensive business case can serve as an important tool in justifying your company's accessibility initiative and communicating about it, both internally and externally.