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Check out PEAT’s takeaways from a recent workshop hosted by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) that explored strategies for aligning XR platforms with inclusive design principles.

The International Association of Accessibility Professionals (IAAP) is seeking your input on a new study to guide the development of the certification of Procurement Specialist in Accessibility. The survey will close on December 31, 2019.

HR Tech is one of the top global events showcasing emerging technologies and tools transforming the human relations (HR) industry. This year, platforms utilizing artificial intelligence (AI) continued to trend, with new focus on mitigating bias and ensuring that AI tools can align with corporate goals for diverse and inclusive hiring.

The recent MAVRIC conference showcased momentum for using X-Reality (XR) to improve people's lives, including people with disabilities.

The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is currently seeking feedback about whether drivers should have the ability to choose between a pre-set list of sounds that alert pedestrians to the presence of electric and hybrid cars when traveling at low speeds. The notice of proposed rulemaking also asks whether NHTSA should impose limits on the number of sounds that manufacturers may install.

Ph.D. student Ather Sharif recounts how this year's Teach Access Study Away program in Silicon Valley connected participants to the skills, knowledge, and networking contacts needed to build accessible technologies for the future.

This year’s expanded 2-day Accessibility Hackathon at the Web for All (W4A) Conference in San Francisco advanced workplace inclusion for people with disabilities by enhancing web-based tools such as Jupyter Notebooks with an accessibility mindset.

This year's CSUN Assistive Technology Conference highlighted the sharp rise of artificial intelligence (AI) into everyday life, charting both the challenges and great potential that AI holds from an accessibility perspective.

The Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University is conducting a survey to examine considerations for workplace technology use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The deadline is June 30, 2019.

By prioritizing accessibility here and now, CES 2019 highlighted how next-generation technology can transform the workforce and make it more inclusive for people with disabilities (PWD).

Check out PEAT’s inside look on the 2018 ICT Accessibility Testing Symposium, and how one student is changing the face of web accessibility in the nonprofit sector.

Leading tech companies are increasingly recognizing the potential of neurological diversity, and are launching dedicated autism hiring initiatives to attract this often overlooked talent pool.

28 years after the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), people with disabilities continue to face unequal access in digital spheres. Oath’s Larry Goldberg argues that making accessibility a central part of technology education is an essential part of the solution.

Facebook’s Director of Accessibility Jeff Wieland and Director of Global Policy Monica Desai recently joined PEAT to discuss why and how Facebook has made accessibility a priority.

Brooke Aiken details the new features and tools recently launched at Section508.gov, the federal government’s website for IT accessibility. While aimed primarily at federal employees and contractors, these tools are broadly useful for anyone seeking to ensure that the technology they are buying is accessible.

Teach Access recently drew students to Silicon Valley for their inaugural Study Away program, where students met with leading companies to learn the value of an accessible technology skill set on the job market—and how it will help them make a real impact on ALL users.

PEAT recently asked our partners to tell us about accessible technology skill levels in their organizations. See a summary of our findings and the corresponding infographic, and check out the actions we're taking to close the gap.

Tech companies are currently struggling to fill job openings because not enough prospective employees have accessible technology skills—and their products are less accessible as a result. Check out PEAT's latest research, and the actions we're taking to close the gap.

Our team joined thousands of accessibility enthusiasts from around the globe at the annual CSUN Assistive Technology Conference last month to exchange insights about the progress of accessibility efforts in technology and business, and to learn what is in store for the future.

Salimah LaForce explains how people with disabilities can help make wireless technologies more accessible by participating in the latest release of the Wireless RERC’s Survey of User Needs (SUN). First launched in 2001, this cornerstone survey provides essential data to engineers, designers, the wireless industry, and government regulators to help make wireless technology more accessible.

 

PEAT's 2017 Think Tank meeting explored key issues related to accessible workplace technology through working groups and rich facilitated discussions. The event generated several tangible recommendations for closing the accessible technology skills gap, expanding government apprenticeship and workforce programs for people with disabilities, and encouraging the development of accessible products.

What does the future hold for accessible IT? Federal and industry executives from across the technology sector recently joined PEAT, supported by the General Services Administration (GSA), to share experiences, learn from each other, and discuss the future of accessible IT.  

As part of our Future of Work series, PEAT has been exploring how coming technology and policy trends may impact people with disabilities at work. The following interview explores the growing gig or freelance economy.

Bobby Silverstein of Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville, PC provided PEAT with background information that he compiled for an interview with us about the policy implications for people with disabilities participating in the gig economy.

At this year's Coleman Conference on Cognitive Disability and Technology, PEAT had the opportunity to learn from experts working on the latest research on technology for people with cognitive disabilities, and to share with attendees the work we do around public policy and accessible workplace technology.

This new video explores the connection between the six phases of employment and where accessible IT comes into play.

While jobs in the technology industry have grown exponentially, they’re not always accessible to applicants with disabilities—and Ather Sharif is on a mission to change that.

This year's USBLN conference focused on “Disability: A Catalyst for Innovation" and showcased accessible technology’s role in fostering business success.

Dr. Shea Tanis, Associate Director of the Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities, recently joined PEAT to discuss why technology access is everyone’s right, and how tech solutions are changing employment opportunities for people with cognitive disabilities.

People with disabilities are propelling technology to become more accessible—which in turn is driving innovative breakthroughs from both companies and the people with disabilities who work at them.

For those who follow the world of web accessibility, this year brought a big development—the first public draft of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1.

Intuit's Ted Drake recently shared some firsthand knowledge and tips for how jobseekers with disabilities can improve their appeal as potential candidates by using social media to craft their own digital brand.

Right out of the gate, this year's M-Enabling Summit had us thinking about our mission in a brand-new way, with an emphasis on one surprising word: octopus.    

Global accessibility leaders identified key strategies of making workplace technology accessible at this year’s Web for All Conference (W4A), which focused on “The Future of Accessible Work.” 

This year’s Accessibility Hack at the Web For All (W4A) Conference demonstrated that collaboration from diverse backgrounds pays big dividends when it comes to accessibility—and that developers can often make easy changes that make a big difference for end users, even when retrofitting a product.

PEAT’s work to foster collaboration and action around accessibility in the workplace would not be possible without contributions from the strong global community that supports us, comprised of accessibility experts, employers, government entities, disability advocates, and others. In celebration of GAAD, here's a list of some of our favorite actionable quotes from our contributors. 

Keeping with tradition, this year's conference delivered another robust line-up of educational sessions highlighting worldwide efforts to make technology more accessible to people with disabilities.