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Technology educator Chancey Fleet discusses where the future of assistive technology going and what HR workplace leaders need to do to make their workplaces and businesses more inclusive and accessible.

As of February 2020, the Department of Justice (DOJ) entered into 175 settlement agreements addressing how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to ICT accessibility. Through these agreements, employers and other covered entities can understand DOJ priorities related to website and ICT accessibility and how to proactively comply with existing rules and guidance.

PEAT recently joined a U.S. Senate staff briefing to provide concrete ideas for how to improve the accessibility of their websites and digital tools for visitors and employees.

Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) are an important part of a company’s diversity and inclusion efforts. But how do you ensure your ERG meetings and events are accessible to everyone? Check out this tipsheet of strategies from PEAT and the Employer Assistance and Resource Network on Disability Inclusion (EARN).

In this short video, Bobby Silverstein provides an overview of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).

By weaving accessibility requirements throughout the RFP, you’ll demonstrate to the vendor that you take it seriously and are truly invested in providing accessible products/services to your users.

Step 8 in the Buy IT! process is to review and learn from your experiences, which can occur immediately after a particular ICT purchase, or at the beginning of a procurement planning endeavor

    Background on accessibility testing best practices for you to consider incorporating into the evaluation and validation phase of your procurement process

    The section of Buy IT will help you review and grade the proposals to select a winning bidder, including help navigating the world of VPATs and ACRs.

    After scanning the marketplace for potential vendors who understand accessibility, you’ll be ready to dig deeper and connect with candidates.

    Once you secure executive buy-in for an accessible ICT procurement program, your planning can begin.

    If you don’t already have executive buy-in for your commitment to accessibility and usability, it’s time to make the case to the powers that be—whether they are top leaders in your organization, your chief information officer (CIO), or the head of procurement. 

    This fact sheet offers AJCs an “at-a-glance” overview of the tech-related implications of WIOA, and where to find assistance in meeting accessible ICT responsibilities.

    The 2014 WIOA Act requires American Job Centers to use technologies that are accessible to individuals with disabilities—and PEAT is here to help in these efforts.

    This guide helps American Job Centers ensure that their websites, online systems and courses, and applications are accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities, as required by the 2014 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).

    Policy Matters provides policy analysis and news regarding laws and regulations, court decisions, and government resources related to the accessibility of technology used in all aspects of employment.

    Here's what you need to know about the U.S. Access Board's long-awaited update to the federal regulations covering the accessibility of ICT and telecommunications products and services.

    Transcript for Implementing Accessible Workplace Tech: Creating Accessible Tables for the Web, featuring Gian Wild of AccessibilityOz. Original recording date: November 9, 2016. 

    Transcript from PEAT Talks: The Global Public Inclusive Infrastructure, featuring Raising the Floor’s Gregg Vanderheiden, originally recorded September 15, 2016.

    Transcript of Introducing TalentWorks webinar with PEAT Project Director Josh Christianson and Lead Strategic Consultant Joiwind Ronen held in April 2016.

    Transcript of PEAT Talks: The Importance of User Testing for Accessibility webinar with Sharron Rush of Knowbility held in March 2016.

    Transcript of PEAT Talks: Raising the Bar on Accessibility webinar with Dan Sullivan of AudioEye held in February 2016.

    In today's race for talent, more and more employers and human resources (HR) professionals are turning to mobile apps to power their online job applications.

    Transcript of the webinar PEAT Talks: Small Business Accessibility through Biz Ability originally held on November 19, 2015.

    In the spirit of NDEAM, PEAT guest contributor Dana Marlowe explores how the practice of "Bring Your Own Device" (BYOD) can boost productivity and help people of all abilities succeed on the job. Marlowe is the founder and president of IT consulting firm Accessibility Partners.

    What's the key to understanding how accessible your products are? A good testing process.

    So you are interested in ensuring that your eRecruiting systems are accessible. You understand that this will widen your candidate pool and ensure you get the very best applicants for each position. So now what? We at Forum One have thought long and hard about this topic and want to share what we have learned.

    Digital interviews have the potential to be a wonderfully accessible option, since the applicant can interview from surroundings already customized to their needs, but there can often be accessibility-related challenges that can impact the fairness and inclusiveness of digital interviews. 

    With proper planning and consideration, you can ensure that all job seekers are able to access and experience your recruiting videos, webcasts and live events. 

    More and more employers are using social media platforms like Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter to advertise job postings and promote their companies, while job seekers are using them to network, learn about career opportunities, and apply for jobs online. But not all social media content is accessible to all people, which limits the reach and effectiveness of these platforms.

    Accessibility matters to people with all kinds of disabilities—not just those with vision and hearing impairments. That means individuals with intellectual and learning disabilities, cognitive issues, traumatic brain injuries, and other disabilities, all of which can make using the Internet more challenging.

    If you're like most employers, your top recruiting priority is to get great people into the talent pipeline—and more importantly, to keep them there. Unfortunately, a job applicant's first impression of a company is sometimes a long, complicated online job application that may or may not be accessible. 

    Imagine that the only thing standing between you and your dream applicant is an online job application that prevents the candidate from clicking the "next" button. Such issues can create employment barriers to qualified candidates and can cause you to miss out on potentially great hires.

    This article provides tips on accessible technology training—from basic disability awareness for all employees, to highly specialized technical training for software and application developers. 

    This article will demystify some of the technical standards that apply to accessibility and explain how they differ from laws and regulations. 

    BYOD stands for "Bring Your Own Device," and it's an increasingly popular policy and practice in many of today's workplaces. BYOD offers some accessibility advantages for both employers and technology users—but there are also some unique challenges.