Resource Library

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Check out PEAT’s takeaways from a recent workshop hosted by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) that explored strategies for aligning XR platforms with inclusive design principles.

Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) are an important part of a company’s diversity and inclusion efforts. But how do you ensure your ERG meetings and events are accessible to everyone? Check out this tipsheet of strategies from PEAT and the Employer Assistance and Resource Network on Disability Inclusion (EARN).

The International Association of Accessibility Professionals (IAAP) is seeking your input on a new study to guide the development of the certification of Procurement Specialist in Accessibility. The survey will close on December 31, 2019.

HR Tech is one of the top global events showcasing emerging technologies and tools transforming the human relations (HR) industry. This year, platforms utilizing artificial intelligence (AI) continued to trend, with new focus on mitigating bias and ensuring that AI tools can align with corporate goals for diverse and inclusive hiring.

The recent MAVRIC conference showcased momentum for using X-Reality (XR) to improve people's lives, including people with disabilities.

The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is currently seeking feedback about whether drivers should have the ability to choose between a pre-set list of sounds that alert pedestrians to the presence of electric and hybrid cars when traveling at low speeds. The notice of proposed rulemaking also asks whether NHTSA should impose limits on the number of sounds that manufacturers may install.

Ph.D. student Ather Sharif recounts how this year's Teach Access Study Away program in Silicon Valley connected participants to the skills, knowledge, and networking contacts needed to build accessible technologies for the future.

This year’s expanded 2-day Accessibility Hackathon at the Web for All (W4A) Conference in San Francisco advanced workplace inclusion for people with disabilities by enhancing web-based tools such as Jupyter Notebooks with an accessibility mindset.

In FY 2013, the Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) launched the Partnership on Employment & Accessible Technology (PEAT). Through FY 2018, PEAT has served as the leading national resource to promote policy action and collaboration to increase the development and adoption of accessible workplace technology.

On January 17, the PEAT Think Tank held an in-person meeting with leadership from the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP). Based on an in-depth analysis of insights gathered at the meeting, PEAT has distilled a set of potential action steps that PEAT, DOL, and other organizations can use to prioritize emerging and prospective efforts around advancing accessible technology and employment.

This year's CSUN Assistive Technology Conference highlighted the sharp rise of artificial intelligence (AI) into everyday life, charting both the challenges and great potential that AI holds from an accessibility perspective.

The Center for Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University is conducting a survey to examine considerations for workplace technology use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The deadline is June 30, 2019.

By prioritizing accessibility here and now, CES 2019 highlighted how next-generation technology can transform the workforce and make it more inclusive for people with disabilities (PWD).

The Department of Justice (DOJ) recently released a significant statement clarifying that digital accessibility is covered by the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Check out PEAT’s inside look on the 2018 ICT Accessibility Testing Symposium, and how one student is changing the face of web accessibility in the nonprofit sector.

Tips to help you ensure that your social media posts are accessible to everyone.

Tech companies are currently struggling to fill job openings because not enough prospective employees have accessible technology skills—and their products are less accessible as a result. Check out PEAT's latest research, and the actions we're taking to close the gap.

Different job roles within your company will require different training levels and skills. This article discusses some typical job roles and the accessibility training they should ideally receive.

People with various permanent, temporary, situational, or changing disabilities access the web in different ways. Check out the following tips to ensure that everyone can use your website—regardless of whether they can manipulate a mouse, their level of vision, how many colors they can see, how much they can hear, or how they process information.

PEAT's 2017 Think Tank meeting explored key issues related to accessible workplace technology through working groups and rich facilitated discussions. The event generated several tangible recommendations for closing the accessible technology skills gap, expanding government apprenticeship and workforce programs for people with disabilities, and encouraging the development of accessible products.

Many accessibility consultants are available for hire to help build and fix accessibility issues, and to provide staff trainings.

As you build and refine your accessible technology initiative, you can find additional training resources and support for yourself and staff through the following professional development resources.

Any digital content your company distributes, either internally or externally, needs to be accessible. This article covers training resources for many popular workplace products.

Resources for getting started with web accessibility. While the average employee doesn’t need to know the nuts and bolts of web accessibility, you’ll want to ensure that anyone involved with the website understands how to upload accessible content.

 

The following resources explore how you can weave accessibility and inclusion into your organizational culture.

As part of our Future of Work series, PEAT has been exploring how coming technology and policy trends may impact people with disabilities at work. The following interview explores the growing gig or freelance economy.

Bobby Silverstein of Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville, PC provided PEAT with background information that he compiled for an interview with us about the policy implications for people with disabilities participating in the gig economy.

By weaving accessibility requirements throughout the RFP, you’ll demonstrate to the vendor that you take it seriously and are truly invested in providing accessible products/services to your users.

After reviewing the responses to your RFI, you’ll be better prepared to define the accessibility requirements for your formal procurement solicitation.

After scanning the marketplace for potential vendors who understand accessibility, you’ll be ready to dig deeper and connect with candidates.

Before issuing a solicitation it is crucial to determine whether the marketplace already houses accessible versions of the products you want to buy. 

Once you secure executive buy-in for an accessible ICT procurement program, your planning can begin.

While jobs in the technology industry have grown exponentially, they’re not always accessible to applicants with disabilities—and Ather Sharif is on a mission to change that.

Designed for internal staff presentations within AJCs, this ready-to-share presentation deck is a perfect tool to train staff on WIOA and accessible technology best practices

For those who follow the world of web accessibility, this year brought a big development—the first public draft of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1.

The 2014 WIOA Act requires American Job Centers to use technologies that are accessible to individuals with disabilities—and PEAT is here to help in these efforts.

Global accessibility leaders identified key strategies of making workplace technology accessible at this year’s Web for All Conference (W4A), which focused on “The Future of Accessible Work.” 

This year’s Accessibility Hack at the Web For All (W4A) Conference demonstrated that collaboration from diverse backgrounds pays big dividends when it comes to accessibility—and that developers can often make easy changes that make a big difference for end users, even when retrofitting a product.

PEAT’s work to foster collaboration and action around accessibility in the workplace would not be possible without contributions from the strong global community that supports us, comprised of accessibility experts, employers, government entities, disability advocates, and others. In celebration of GAAD, here's a list of some of our favorite actionable quotes from our contributors. 

This guide helps American Job Centers ensure that their websites, online systems and courses, and applications are accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities, as required by the 2014 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).