Resource Library

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Any digital content your company distributes, either internally or externally, needs to be accessible. This article covers training resources for many popular workplace products.

Resources for getting started with web accessibility. While the average employee doesn’t need to know the nuts and bolts of web accessibility, you’ll want to ensure that anyone involved with the website understands how to upload accessible content.

 

The following resources explore how you can weave accessibility and inclusion into your organizational culture.

As part of our Future of Work series, PEAT has been exploring how coming technology and policy trends may impact people with disabilities at work. The following interview explores the growing gig or freelance economy.

Bobby Silverstein of Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville, PC provided PEAT with background information that he compiled for an interview with us about the policy implications for people with disabilities participating in the gig economy.

By weaving accessibility requirements throughout the RFP, you’ll demonstrate to the vendor that you take it seriously and are truly invested in providing accessible products/services to your users.

After reviewing the responses to your RFI, you’ll be better prepared to define the accessibility requirements for your formal procurement solicitation.

After scanning the marketplace for potential vendors who understand accessibility, you’ll be ready to dig deeper and connect with candidates.

Before issuing a solicitation it is crucial to determine whether the marketplace already houses accessible versions of the products you want to buy. 

Once you secure executive buy-in for an accessible ICT procurement program, your planning can begin.

While jobs in the technology industry have grown exponentially, they’re not always accessible to applicants with disabilities—and Ather Sharif is on a mission to change that.

Designed for internal staff presentations within AJCs, this ready-to-share presentation deck is a perfect tool to train staff on WIOA and accessible technology best practices

For those who follow the world of web accessibility, this year brought a big development—the first public draft of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1.

The 2014 WIOA Act requires American Job Centers to use technologies that are accessible to individuals with disabilities—and PEAT is here to help in these efforts.

Global accessibility leaders identified key strategies of making workplace technology accessible at this year’s Web for All Conference (W4A), which focused on “The Future of Accessible Work.” 

This year’s Accessibility Hack at the Web For All (W4A) Conference demonstrated that collaboration from diverse backgrounds pays big dividends when it comes to accessibility—and that developers can often make easy changes that make a big difference for end users, even when retrofitting a product.

PEAT’s work to foster collaboration and action around accessibility in the workplace would not be possible without contributions from the strong global community that supports us, comprised of accessibility experts, employers, government entities, disability advocates, and others. In celebration of GAAD, here's a list of some of our favorite actionable quotes from our contributors. 

This guide helps American Job Centers ensure that their websites, online systems and courses, and applications are accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities, as required by the 2014 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).

Self-driving cars show exciting promise to address existing barriers for people with disabilities traveling to and from work—as long as developers incorporate accessibility into these technologies from the start.

By 2020, experts predict that 82% of consumer web traffic will be video. This factsheet on producing accessible videos will help ensure that your videos reach a full audience.