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Deputy Secretary of Labor Chris Lu discusses his takeaways from meeting with the great Stevie Wonder and hundreds of other dedicated leading accessibility "stars" at last month's International Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference (CSUN). 

While new technologies have broken down countless barriers for individuals with disabilities, job hunting online continues to be fraught with accessibility-related obstacles that the general population may not even realize exist. And as GettingHired's Gabrielle Nagle discusses, inaccessible eRecruiting doesn’t just affect the job seeker, but also the employer.

As businesses compete to attract talented, skilled employees, it’s important to make sure that artificial barriers aren’t blocking their path. In this cautionary tale, Sassy Outwater explains how employers may be missing out on top candidates when their online hiring and recruiting systems aren't accessible.

The terms “accessibility” and “universal design” are often used together these days. But what is actually meant by these two terms? Sina Bahram, a digital accessibility expert, broke it down for us at our January PEAT Talk.

In today's race for talent, more and more employers and human resources (HR) professionals are turning to mobile apps to power their online job applications.

If you're one of the cutting-edge employers using pre-employment tests to screen potential hires, have you stopped to consider whether those tests are accessible to all applicants? It's an important question that speaks to both equal employment opportunity, and your capacity to cast the widest net possible when fishing for talent.

Online hiring practices have made it increasingly easy to apply for a job—unless you’re a person with a disability, that is. Senior Web Accessibility Consultant Denis Boudreau explores the problem of why the employment rate of Americans with disabilities has continued to drop for the last 25 years, and how web designers and developers hold a key to improving the situation.

For several members of the PEAT team, October was a busy month of travel, talk, and trend spotting as we headed west to attend three conferences: the Coleman Institute on Cognitive Disabilities Annual Conference; HR Technology Conference and Expo (HR Tech); and the International Association of Accessibility Professionals (IAAP) Access 2015. All presented valuable opportunities for our team to learn, share knowledge, examine future trends, and identify ways to strengthen PEAT's work.

The six phases of the Employment Lifecycle and their corresponding technologies. 

What's the key to understanding how accessible your products are? A good testing process.

When buying a piece of eRecruiting technology, employers and human resources professionals can often feel like they're at the mercy of the vendors who are selling or building the technology. This tip sheet explores techniques for communicating about accessibility—clearly, directly, and throughout the technology development lifecycle.

In today’s business world, eRecruiting tools are everywhere. As these tools become more and more commonplace, employers are asking important questions about the legal responsibilities they may have to make those tools accessible to all users, including job seekers with disabilities.

So you are interested in ensuring that your eRecruiting systems are accessible. You understand that this will widen your candidate pool and ensure you get the very best applicants for each position. So now what? We at Forum One have thought long and hard about this topic and want to share what we have learned.

Digital interviews have the potential to be a wonderfully accessible option, since the applicant can interview from surroundings already customized to their needs, but there can often be accessibility-related challenges that can impact the fairness and inclusiveness of digital interviews. 

With proper planning and consideration, you can ensure that all job seekers are able to access and experience your recruiting videos, webcasts and live events. 

More and more employers are using social media platforms like Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter to advertise job postings and promote their companies, while job seekers are using them to network, learn about career opportunities, and apply for jobs online. But not all social media content is accessible to all people, which limits the reach and effectiveness of these platforms.

This tip sheet describes some common accessibility issues faced by people with several types of disabilities—including those affecting vision, hearing, physical, and cognitive skills. It highlights tips and exemplary practices that HR professionals can share with the technology designers and developers who are purchasing, building, modifying, and improving their eRecruiting tools, websites, and mobile applications.

Accessibility matters to people with all kinds of disabilities—not just those with vision and hearing impairments. That means individuals with intellectual and learning disabilities, cognitive issues, traumatic brain injuries, and other disabilities, all of which can make using the Internet more challenging.

Despite all of the advances in technology, employers are still having trouble filling positions. Of course, there are a number of reasons why finding talent is so difficult. But what if one of those boiled down to a fundamental problem with the technology tools employers are using? What if top talent is falling through the cracks due to accessibility issues, rather than a lack of qualifications?