Resource Library

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Tips to help you ensure that your social media posts are accessible to everyone.

Find resources to get started with training staff across your organization in the accessibility skills relevant to their specific roles.

Different job roles within your company will require different training levels and skills. This article discusses some typical job roles and the accessibility training they should ideally receive.

People with various permanent, temporary, situational, or changing disabilities access the web in different ways. Check out the following tips to ensure that everyone can use your website—regardless of whether they can manipulate a mouse, their level of vision, how many colors they can see, how much they can hear, or how they process information.

Many accessibility consultants are available for hire to help build and fix accessibility issues, and to provide staff trainings.

As you build and refine your accessible technology initiative, you can find additional training resources and support for yourself and staff through the following professional development resources:

AccessU

This annual conference offers instructional courses in digital accessibility, including online sessions for remote attendees.

Any digital content your company distributes, either internally or externally, needs to be accessible. This article covers training resources for many popular workplace products.

Resources for getting started with web accessibility. While the average employee doesn’t need to know the nuts and bolts of web accessibility, you’ll want to ensure that anyone involved with the website understands how to upload accessible content.

 

The following resources explore how you can weave accessibility and inclusion into your organizational culture.

Event Date: 
December 11, 2017 - 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm EST

This webinar is focused on strategies to improve coordination between the public workforce system and employers to help businesses overcome barriers to recruiting, hiring, and training individuals with disabilities.

As businesses compete to attract talented, skilled employees, it’s important to make sure that artificial barriers aren’t blocking their path. In this cautionary tale, Sassy Outwater explains how employers may be missing out on top candidates when their online hiring and recruiting systems aren't accessible.

View a discussion with state accessibility CIOs Jeff Kline, Sarah Bourne, and Jay Wyant regarding Policy-Driven Adoption for Accessibility (PDAA). This new approach can help achieve higher levels of accessibility in vendor-provided products and services over the long term.

This article provides tips on accessible technology training—from basic disability awareness for all employees, to highly specialized technical training for software and application developers. 

Lainey Feingold is a nationally-recognized disability rights lawyer known for negotiating landmark accessibility agreements and pioneering the collaborative advocacy and dispute resolution method known as “Structured Negotiations.” PEAT recently spoke with Feingold about her work around digital accessibility and its impact on the employment of people with disabilities.

Once your company commits to increasing the accessibility of its workplace technology, it is smart to communicate that commitment, both internally and externally.

 
 

Once developed, a solid, comprehensive business case can serve as an important tool in justifying your company's accessibility initiative and communicating about it, both internally and externally.