Resource Library

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When it comes to the accessibility of web pages, web applications and web tools, most people turn to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG). In order to help technology providers and employers understand the basics of WCAG and other related accessibility standards, PEAT spoke with the World Wide Web Consortium’s (W3C) Shawn Henry, who leads their worldwide education and outreach promoting web accessibility.

For several members of the PEAT team, October was a busy month of travel, talk, and trend spotting as we headed west to attend three conferences: the Coleman Institute on Cognitive Disabilities Annual Conference; HR Technology Conference and Expo (HR Tech); and the International Association of Accessibility Professionals (IAAP) Access 2015. All presented valuable opportunities for our team to learn, share knowledge, examine future trends, and identify ways to strengthen PEAT's work.

Event Date: 
January 21, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm EST

Universal design allows us to develop content and experiences that are inclusive of the widest possible audience. In this recorded webinar, Sina Bahram discusses how Prime Access Consulting (PAC) has worked with museums, universities, and corporations to successfully apply universal design principles to help advance digital accessibility for a variety of clients.

Transcript from the PEAT Talks: Embracing the Concept of "Bring Your Own Device" (BYOD) webinar held on October 15, 2015.

In the spirit of NDEAM, PEAT guest contributor Dana Marlowe explores how the practice of "Bring Your Own Device" (BYOD) can boost productivity and help people of all abilities succeed on the job. Marlowe is the founder and president of IT consulting firm Accessibility Partners.

What's the key to understanding how accessible your products are? A good testing process.

When buying a piece of eRecruiting technology, employers and human resources professionals can often feel like they're at the mercy of the vendors who are selling or building the technology. This tip sheet explores techniques for communicating about accessibility—clearly, directly, and throughout the technology development lifecycle.

The TalentWorks Resource Library is a collection of all featured resources from each TalentWorks page. This also includes links to additional external resources that may be helpful as you refine your eRecruiting processes. 

In today’s business world, eRecruiting tools are everywhere. As these tools become more and more commonplace, employers are asking important questions about the legal responsibilities they may have to make those tools accessible to all users, including job seekers with disabilities.

So you are interested in ensuring that your eRecruiting systems are accessible. You understand that this will widen your candidate pool and ensure you get the very best applicants for each position. So now what? We at Forum One have thought long and hard about this topic and want to share what we have learned.

Digital interviews have the potential to be a wonderfully accessible option, since the applicant can interview from surroundings already customized to their needs, but there can often be accessibility-related challenges that can impact the fairness and inclusiveness of digital interviews. 

With proper planning and consideration, you can ensure that all job seekers are able to access and experience your recruiting videos, webcasts and live events. 

More and more employers are using social media platforms like Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter to advertise job postings and promote their companies, while job seekers are using them to network, learn about career opportunities, and apply for jobs online. But not all social media content is accessible to all people, which limits the reach and effectiveness of these platforms.

This tip sheet describes some common accessibility issues faced by people with several types of disabilities—including those affecting vision, hearing, physical, and cognitive skills. It highlights tips and exemplary practices that HR professionals can share with the technology designers and developers who are purchasing, building, modifying, and improving their eRecruiting tools, websites, and mobile applications.

Despite all of the advances in technology, employers are still having trouble filling positions. Of course, there are a number of reasons why finding talent is so difficult. But what if one of those boiled down to a fundamental problem with the technology tools employers are using? What if top talent is falling through the cracks due to accessibility issues, rather than a lack of qualifications?

If you're like most employers, your top recruiting priority is to get great people into the talent pipeline—and more importantly, to keep them there. Unfortunately, a job applicant's first impression of a company is sometimes a long, complicated online job application that may or may not be accessible. 

Finding good employees is not what it used to be. Instead of candidates mailing or dropping off hard copy resumes to your place of business, most candidates today discover job openings through online searches. It's a trend that is benefiting employers and job seekers alike.

Now it's time to actually make your eRecruiting tools accessible, from your recruitment portals and online job banks, to your corporate "careers" micro-site, online job application systems, pre-employment screening tools, digital interview technology, and your applicant tracking system. 

Imagine that the only thing standing between you and your dream applicant is an online job application that prevents the candidate from clicking the "next" button. Such issues can create employment barriers to qualified candidates and can cause you to miss out on potentially great hires.