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As of May 2016, the Department of Justice (DOJ) entered into 171 settlement agreements addressing how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to ICT accessibility. Through these agreements, employers and other covered entities can understand DOJ priorities related to website and ICT accessibility and how to proactively comply with existing rules and guidance.

When the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law in 1990, much of the technology currently used in workplace did not yet exist. In honor of the ADA's 26th anniversary, legal expert Bobby Silverstein recently sat down with PEAT for an in-depth Q&A exploring how the ADA applies to workplace ICT, and how recent settlements are impacting this issue.

Event Date: 
July 21, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm EDT

Must employers make web-based employment information and services accessible to everyone, including those with disabilities? Bobby Silverstein discusses how the ADA applies to accessible workplace technology.

DOJ is looking at establishing accessibility requirements for online services, programs, and activities provided to the public by state and local governments—including many employment-related tools and resources. 

Deputy Secretary of Labor Chris Lu discusses his takeaways from meeting with the great Stevie Wonder and hundreds of other dedicated leading accessibility "stars" at last month's International Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference (CSUN). 

Powers Pyles Sutter and Verville principal Bobby Silverstein details the various accessibility policies and how companies can strategize to make this part of their company culture.

Robert "Bobby" Silverstein, one of the behind-the-scenes architects of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), reflects upon how the ADA is now increasingly playing a critical role in ensuring equal employment opportunities for people with disabilities by ensuring the accessibility of information and communication technologies (ICT).

Lainey Feingold is a nationally-recognized disability rights lawyer known for negotiating landmark accessibility agreements and pioneering the collaborative advocacy and dispute resolution method known as “Structured Negotiations.” PEAT recently spoke with Feingold about her work around digital accessibility and its impact on the employment of people with disabilities.

CLOSED: On February 27, 2015, the U.S. Access Board published a proposed update to the rules implementing Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, which outlines the federal standards and guidelines for making information and communications technology (ICT) accessible to people with disabilities. The public comment period closed on May 28, 2015.

Federal laws and regulations, such as "Section 508" and the "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act" (CVAA) provide helpful and detailed information about technical standards that employers can use to guide their use and procurement of technology that is accessible to all users, including people with disabilities. 

This article will demystify some of the technical standards that apply to accessibility and explain how they differ from laws and regulations.