Resource Library

Displaying 1 - 12 of 12. Show 5 | 10 results per page.

Our team joined thousands of accessibility enthusiasts from around the globe at the annual CSUN Assistive Technology Conference last month to exchange insights about the progress of accessibility efforts in technology and business, and to learn what is in store for the future.

Step 8 in the Buy IT! process is to review and learn from your experiences, which can occur immediately after a particular ICT purchase, or at the beginning of a procurement planning endeavor

    Model procurement language you can use when developing and negotiating a contract with a vendor

    Sample solicitation language you can use when finalizing your RFP or RFQ.

      Once you secure executive buy-in for an accessible ICT procurement program, your planning can begin.

      The National Council on Disability’s 2016 report to Congress notably recognizes accessible workplace technology as a right for all Americans and a key pathway to employment, and provides actionable recommendations for the federal government, technology industry, and private and public sectors.

      As of May 2016, the Department of Justice (DOJ) entered into 171 settlement agreements addressing how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to ICT accessibility. Through these agreements, employers and other covered entities can understand DOJ priorities related to website and ICT accessibility and how to proactively comply with existing rules and guidance.

      When growing an accessible workplace technology effort, it can be daunting to efficiently address gaps in your knowledge base. However, you don't have to do it alone. Eliza Greenwood recently attended the annual AccessU conference to improve her own skills, and reports that the opportunity to practice digital accessibility "hands on" in computer labs made a big difference.

      What's the key to understanding how accessible your products are? A good testing process.

      Headquartered in Washington, D.C., CTIAThe Wireless Association® represents the wireless communications industry and has a history of leadership on mobile accessibility issues.

      We recently spoke with CTIA's Matthew Gerst, director of state regulatory & external affairs, about CTIA's work in this area.

      Employers with strong, mature accessibility initiatives usually have support from the top—executives and other leaders who communicate their commitment to an information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure that is inclusive of people with disabilities throughout the organization.But what type of executive should spearhead your initiative? And how can you, as an internal accessibility advocate, recruit such a leader? PEAT suggests three easy action steps to get you on the right path.

      To ensure their products are accessible to the widest range of people—including people with disabilities—many technology providers implement internal initiatives focused specifically on information and communications technology (ICT) accessibility. To be successful, such an initiative must be guided by a well-rounded team of committed individuals, each bringing specific skills and resources to the table.