Resource Library

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Images are a core aspect of most website designs today, and they can even increase the accessibility of a webpage for many users, such as employees and job seekers with cognitive and learning disabilities. Adding graphics, drawings, illustrations, graphs, and charts can benefit many users by increasing a person’s ability to understand the concepts at hand.

Writing good alternative text for website images means focusing on quality, not quantity. To ensure equal access for employees and job seekers using screen readers, you must tailor each image description on your website to the specific context it is used in. 

Section 255 requires manufacturers to ensure that telecommunications equipment and services are designed, developed, and fabricated to be accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities, when it is readily achievable to do so.

If you’ve got a website, you may be relying on tables to convey information. But if those tables are not created correctly, they can create a real mess for employees and job seekers trying to access the information they need, particularly people who are blind, people with low vision, and people with cognitive disabilities. To learn what makes a good table—and the pitfalls of bad ones!—please read on.

Today, the ability to use ICT technologies is a core element of most jobs, but many applications and websites aren't accessible to everyone. What if employees could use the access features they need anywhere, anytime, on any device? In our September PEAT Talk, Raising the Floor’s Gregg Vanderheiden revealed that this reality may be closer than you think. 

Event Date: 
October 20, 2016 - 1:00 pm to 1:30 pm EDT

Maria Town, Senior Associate Director for the White House Office of Public Engagement, discusses the important work that the current Administration has done to promote the use of accessible technology in workplaces nationwide. 

Could your company’s social media recruitment practices be inadvertently screening out qualified candidates with disabilities? In our June PEAT Talk, digital marketer Eliza Greenwood discussed the simple steps you can take to ensure that your messaging is reaching a full audience.

DOJ is looking at establishing accessibility requirements for online services, programs, and activities provided to the public by state and local governments—including many employment-related tools and resources.