Resource Library

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Reyma McDeid, Executive Director of the Central Iowa Center for Independent Living (CICIL), discusses how employers can address their business needs and meet those needs by hiring a diverse workforce, including people with disabilities.

Joel Ward, Technology Strategist and AR Product Manager for Booz Allen Hamilton, discusses the current and future impact of XR on workplace training and how the XR Access initiative is working to make virtual, mixed, and augmented realities accessible.

What will the next 30 years look like for people with disabilities? Emerging technologies are rapidly changing the world of work.

Accessibility means that everyone can use the exact same technology as anyone else—regardless of whether they can manipulate a mouse, how much vision they have, how many colors they can see, how much they can hear, or how they process information. Accessible technology adds layers into computer operating systems, mobile phones, and more to allow people with disabilities to access the same information as everyone else.

X-Reality (XR), also known as extended reality, is an umbrella term to describe virtual, augmented, and mixed reality technologies. X-Reality is changing the way we interact with the world around us and will, undoubtedly, shape the future of work.

Autonomous vehicles (AV), also referred to as driverless or self-driving vehicles, have the potential to revolutionize transportation and make sweeping changes to the way people interact with the world around them. AV technology can alter the where, when, and how of transportation, for both personal and commercial purposes. Already being used in some cities, technology corporations and manufacturers are planning for the wide-spread production and use of these vehicles within the next few decades.

The use of artificial intelligence (AI) and automated technologies is changing workplaces. Although data analytics and automation are not new, AI technology has advanced rapidly in recent years alongside innovations in algorithms, data volume, and computing power. AI-powered platforms are now used to screen job applicants, streamline the application process, and provide on-the-job training. AI is also powering exciting innovations in assistive technology for people with disabilities.

Technology educator Chancey Fleet discusses where the future of assistive technology going and what HR workplace leaders need to do to make their workplaces and businesses more inclusive and accessible.

As of February 2020, the Department of Justice (DOJ) entered into 175 settlement agreements addressing how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to ICT accessibility. Through these agreements, employers and other covered entities can understand DOJ priorities related to website and ICT accessibility and how to proactively comply with existing rules and guidance.

PEAT recently joined a U.S. Senate staff briefing to provide concrete ideas for how to improve the accessibility of their websites and digital tools for visitors and employees.