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Today, everything from your paycheck to your company’s recruitment portal is likely powered by electronic payroll systems and human capital management platforms. Jennifer Ravalli of ADP recently joined PEAT to discuss how and why ADP has worked with accessible software provider AudioEye to make their cloud-based HR platforms more accessible.

This short video describes the origins and goals of TalentWorks and invites you to join the conversation.

Event Date: 
March 21, 2017 - 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EDT

Today, many industries are actively recruiting people with autism and other neurological disabilities into their workforces, particularly in fields such as accounting, engineering, and information technology. Join PEAT and the Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN) for a Twitter Chat to discuss the specific ways employers can leverage accessible technology to meet the needs of neurodiverse individuals—and also maximize the productivity of all employees. You can join the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #PEATTalks.

Headed to CSUN 2017? Marcy Sutton of Deque Systems invites developers and non-developers alike to help make workplace technology products more accessible to people with disabilities by joining the aXe Hackathon.

Rachel Kerrigan of the Perkins-Business Partnership joined PEAT Talks to discuss how they are helping to bridge the hiring gap for people with disabilities by educating HR professionals online about common barriers to access. 

AccessibilityOz CEO Gian Wild explains why making your videos accessible also boosts user engagement generally.

The annual HR Technology Conference is always an essential event for PEAT, given their focus on technology tools and trends shaping the field of human resources. This year we left feeling more excited and energized than ever, because the topic of accessibility is finally starting to take hold in the hearts and minds of HR Tech stakeholders.

Writing good alternative text for website images means focusing on quality, not quantity. To ensure equal access for employees and job seekers using screen readers, you must tailor each image description on your website to the specific context it is used in. 

Section 255 requires manufacturers to ensure that telecommunications equipment and services are designed, developed, and fabricated to be accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities, when it is readily achievable to do so.

If you’ve got a website, you may be relying on tables to convey information. But if those tables are not created correctly, they can create a real mess for employees and job seekers trying to access the information they need, particularly people who are blind, people with low vision, and people with cognitive disabilities. To learn what makes a good table—and the pitfalls of bad ones!—please read on.

It’s no surprise that a team effort is essential for providing accessibility professionals with a strong network of professional support, and in our August PEAT Talk, Rob Sinclair discussed how the recent merger of IAAP and G3ict will promote and support the accessibility profession on a more global scale.

Last month’s M-Enabling Summit brought international leaders together from a range of fields connected to the promotion and advancement of accessible mobile applications—and allowed PEAT to advance key actions related to accessible technology issues impacting employment though a policy roundtable and a panel discussion.

Could your company’s social media recruitment practices be inadvertently screening out qualified candidates with disabilities? In our June PEAT Talk, digital marketer Eliza Greenwood discussed the simple steps you can take to ensure that your messaging is reaching a full audience.