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Josh Christianson, Co-Director of PEAT, the Partnership on Employment and Accessible Technology, discusses how employers can make the virtual workplace accessible. 

Alexandra Reeve Givens, Founder and Executive Director of the Institute for Technology, Law and Policy at Georgetown University, discusses how employers need to be aware of both the benefits and potential liabilities associated with using AI in the hiring process, particularly regarding the recruitment and interviewing process for people with disabilities.

Many employers and employees have shifted to telework. PEAT is here to help with the transition to ensure your digital communications and platforms are as accessible as possible for everyone, including people with disabilities.

Gregg Vanderheiden, Executive Director of the Trace R&D Center at the University of Maryland and Co-Director of Raising the Floor, discusses how employers can find and select accessible workplace technology. Gregg also introduces us to Morphic, an innovative operating system extension that makes assistive technologies and settings show up on any computer a person needs to use. 

Accessibility means that everyone can use the exact same technology as anyone else—regardless of whether they can manipulate a mouse, how much vision they have, how many colors they can see, how much they can hear, or how they process information. Accessible technology adds layers into computer operating systems, mobile phones, and more to allow people with disabilities to access the same information as everyone else.