Resource Library

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8. Show 5 results per page.

When it comes to accessibility, VPATs are the most common form of information exchange between vendors and their customers. And at Elsevier, they’ve found that making these reports an organizational priority simply makes good business sense.

If you don’t already have executive buy-in for your commitment to accessibility and usability, it’s time to make the case to the powers that be—whether they are top leaders in your organization, your chief information officer (CIO), or the head of procurement. 

When it comes to fostering an ICT procurement process that prioritizes accessibility and usability, the first step is to set your procurement priorities. 

Event Date: 
June 16, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm EDT

Do you post job openings on Twitter and Instagram, or use LinkedIn to vet candidates? Today, 79% of job seekers use social media to locate job opportunities. In this webinar, digital marketer Eliza Greenwood will discuss steps to ensure that your social media recruiting efforts for active and passive talent can successfully reach candidates with disabilities. ​

Event Date: 
February 18, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm EST

Dan Sullivan, Vice President of Sales at AudioEye, talks about the return-on-investment for employers who embrace accessible technology that benefits all users.

When it comes to the accessibility of web pages, web applications and web tools, most people turn to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), the internationally recognized standards developed and maintained by the World Wide Web Consortium’s (W3C) Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI). In order to help technology providers and employers understand the basics of WCAG and other related accessibility standards, PEAT spoke with the W3C's Shawn Henry, who leads their worldwide education and outreach promoting web accessibility.

This article explores tips for communicating about accessibility–clearly, directly, and throughout the technology development lifecycle.

If you're an employer about to take a leap into an accessible workplace technology effort, you might be wondering where to begin. It's a question I'm often asked by people who understand the "why" behind accessibility, but who are daunted by the "how." But getting started is actually pretty simple.