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After scanning the marketplace for potential vendors who understand accessibility, you’ll be ready to dig deeper and connect with candidates.

Before issuing a solicitation it is crucial to determine whether the marketplace already houses accessible versions of the products you want to buy. 

Once you secure executive buy-in for an accessible ICT procurement program, your planning can begin.

There are several steps to take before you buy to ensure your technology purchase is strategic, informed, and accessible to all users.

If you don’t already have executive buy-in for your commitment to accessibility and usability, it’s time to make the case to the powers that be—whether they are top leaders in your organization, your chief information officer (CIO), or the head of procurement. 

When it comes to fostering an ICT procurement process that prioritizes accessibility and usability, the first step is to set your procurement priorities. 

Implementing accessible technology in your workplace means buying accessible tech in the first place. This new resource helps employers and their purchasing staff build accessibility and usability into their information and communication technology (ICT) procurement processes.

Employers and other entities covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act and Title V of the Rehabilitation Act can add the following procurement language to contracts with product vendors to enhance the accessibility of purchased or licensed products.

Event Date: 
April 21, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm EDT

Join Denis Boudreau, senior web accessibility consultant for Deque, to learn the simple steps that web developers and designers can take to ensure that job seekers with disabilities are not excluded from employment opportunities.

If you're an employer—in any industry—who is getting ready to issue a solicitation for technology products or support, or to talk to specific vendors about what they can offer, a little background research can help you identify the accessibility barriers and solutions for the products you are seeking.

In his book, Strategic IT Accessibility: Enabling the Organization, IT accessibility expert Jeff Kline outlines 10 steps for determining where and when accessibility can be infused into the procurement process.

BYOD stands for "Bring Your Own Device," and it's an increasingly popular policy and practice in many of today's workplaces. BYOD offers some accessibility advantages for both employers and technology users—but there are also some unique challenges.

To optimize their employment potential, individuals with disabilities should have a basic understanding of what accessible workplace technology is—and use this knowledge to assess and meet their own needs.

A good testing process, including accurate and comprehensive reporting on testing results, can improve communication with employees, customers, and other end users about your company's commitment to accessibility and foster a culture of continuous improvement.

To help your organization realize the many benefits of accessible design, here are PEAT's top tips for factoring accessibility into the entire product development lifecycle.