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An introductory blog post officially announcing the launch of PEATworks.org, an interactive online resource focused on accessible technology in the workplace.

Today, many companies are implementing “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) policies—meaning employees use their own mobile devices (laptops, tablets, and smartphones) at work to access company information and applications.

Measurement is an important part of ensuring an accessible technology initiative is meeting its intended goals. 

Different enterprises may perform accessibility gap analyses or needs assessments in different ways; some use a dedicated accessibility tool, while others add an accessibility section to a general product management tool.

When a company adopts an accessibility initiative, whether formal or not, it is valuable to communicate that commitment, both internally and externally.

Strong accessibility initiatives usually have support from the top—executives and other leaders who communicate their commitment to an ICT infrastructure that is inclusive of people with disabilities.

PEAT recently spoke with Julia Bascom, the Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN)’s director of programs, about the organization's work in the area of accessible technology and its important to people with autism and cognitive disabilities in general.

We recently spoke with CTIA's Matthew Gerst, director of state regulatory & external affairs, about CTIA's work in the area of mobile accessibility.

PEAT recently spoke with the World Institute on Disability (WID)'s executive director Anita Aaron about her organization's work in the area of accessible technology.

Some organizations use a business case to justify their accessibility initiative and help drive its development. Some do not, arguing that accessibility simply has to be done, for many good reasons. What’s your take?

As you develop and implement your accessibility initiative, it's important to know—and be able to prove—that your activities are having a positive effect.

Federal laws and regulations, such as "Section 508" and the "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act" (CVAA) provide helpful and detailed information about technical standards that employers can use to guide their use and procurement of technology that is accessible to all users, including people with disabilities. 

Live recording of the webinar "Powering Up Your Employment Potential Through  Accessible Technology" originally recorded on Friday, September 26, 2014.

Ernst & Young, LLP (EY)'s commitment to inclusion extends to accessible workplace technology, and PEAT recently spoke with Lori B. Golden, the firm's abilities strategy leader, to learn more.

To learn more about the company’s commitment to providing accessible products and services for the workplace, PEAT recently spoke with Paul Albano, a senior product manager at Canon U.S.A's Business Imaging Solutions Group.