Public policy & law

Many laws and public policies cover accessibility in the workplace; understanding them can provide your initiative with motivation and guidance.

As of May 2016, the Department of Justice (DOJ) entered into 171 settlement agreements addressing how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to ICT accessibility. Through these agreements, employers and other covered entities can understand DOJ priorities related to website and ICT accessibility and how to proactively comply with existing rules and guidance.

The Department of Justice is requesting approval to research the benefits of accessible web content for people who are blind—including websites and ICT that are essential in most workplaces today. These results would inform future rulemaking under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), including the ADA's application to accessible workplace technology.

PEAT encourages public comments from stakeholders committed to accessible technology in the workplace in order to help assess the need for this research, and best practices for gathering the information. You can submit comments until August 30, 2016

When the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law in 1990, much of the technology currently used in workplace did not yet exist. In honor of the ADA's 26th anniversary, legal expert Bobby Silverstein recently sat down with PEAT for an in-depth Q&A exploring how the ADA applies to workplace ICT, and how recent settlements are impacting this issue.

Must employers make web-based employment information and services accessible to everyone, including those with disabilities? Bobby Silverstein discusses how the ADA applies to accessible workplace technology.

DOJ is looking at establishing accessibility requirements for online services, programs, and activities provided to the public by state and local governments—including many employment-related tools and resources.