News and Top Trends

PEAT is partnering with Apprenti to build bridges between the technology industry and inclusive apprenticeships. Combining classroom instruction with on-the-job training, apprenticeship programs can help companies quickly bring new and more diverse talent into the workplace—including people with disabilities.

Larry Goldberg of Oath (formerly Yahoo) and Kate Sonka of Michigan State University discuss how the Teach Access collaborative is helping leading tech companies and universities partner to ensure that the next generation of tech developers and designers learn to think and build inclusively. 

Our team joined thousands of accessibility enthusiasts from around the globe at the annual CSUN Assistive Technology Conference last month to exchange insights about the progress of accessibility efforts in technology and business, and to learn what is in store for the future.

In the tech industry, the investment that drives innovation is talent. Today, more and more tech companies are discovering a proven strategy for building a highly skilled workforce to grow and to thrive: apprenticeships.

Salimah LaForce explains how people with disabilities can help make wireless technologies more accessible by participating in the latest release of the Wireless RERC’s Survey of User Needs (SUN). First launched in 2001, this cornerstone survey provides essential data to engineers, designers, the wireless industry, and government regulators to help make wireless technology more accessible.

 

Jeff Bigham of Carnegie Mellon University discusses how computer scientists rely on crowdsourced testing to make technologies more accessible, and how the flexibility of crowd work intersects with growing opportunities in the gig economy for people with disabilities.

Researcher Martez Mott is working to create new touch interaction techniques for mobile technologies using machine-based learning. In this episode, he explains how this emerging technology will improve workplace technology with touch screens by allowing users with a range of motor abilities to customize their touch techniques.

PEAT's 2017 Think Tank meeting explored key issues related to accessible workplace technology through working groups and rich facilitated discussions with 63 participants representing industry, government, academia, and the disability community. The event generated several tangible recommendations for closing the accessible technology skills gap, expanding government apprenticeship and workforce programs for people with disabilities, and encouraging the development of accessible products.

Here at PEAT, we spend a lot of time talking about the importance of accessible technology in the workplace. But how do we ensure that budding computer engineers and programmers have the skills they need to develop accessible tech in the first place?