The ROI of Accessible eRecruiting

Of course any initiative you undertake boils down to the return on investment, and accessibility should be no exception. Thankfully, purchasing and using accessible technology—including accessible eRecruiting tools—can benefit your organization immensely. Read on to learn how...

The Benefits of Accessible Workplace Technology

When it comes to human capital, taking steps to improve the accessibility of your workplace technology infrastructure within all stages of the employment lifecycle can reap significant rewards in terms of enhanced employee productivity and bottom line benefits. Watch this PEAT featured resource video to hear experts' opinions on why implementing accessible technology matters.

Improved and expanded recruitment is the #1 benefit of accessible eRecruiting tools

After all, an accessible website and online job application system ensures—and clearly communicates—that your company is interested in all qualified people. It's a clear way to expand your applicant pool, by allowing more people to get their foot in the "virtual door," and then seek opportunities for advancement once on board. 

When it comes to human capital, taking steps to improve the accessibility of your workplace technology infrastructure within all stages of the employment lifecycle can reap significant rewards in terms of enhanced employee productivity and bottom line benefits.

Savvy businesses know that a diverse workforce, leads to more innovative solutions for confronting challenges and achieving success

Of course, interviewing job applicants with disabilities increases your chances of hiring qualified people with disabilities, and the benefits of fostering an inclusive workplace are well documented. The following benefits equate to an irrefutable ROI for adopting accessible workplace technology within all phases of the employment lifecycle.

Productivity

All employees need technology tools to do their job, from computers to online forms to mobile phones. And some accessibility features actually help many people, with and without disabilities, increase their productivity. Usability features such as volume control, highly readable screens, open video captioning, and plain language are just a few examples of universal design (UD), an important trend in product development.

The bottom line is that ensuring all employees have what they need to be as productive as possible simply makes good business sense. This principle is at the very heart of the argument for providing accessible workplace technology.

Diversity

Savvy businesses know that a diverse workforce, inclusive of people with many backgrounds and experiences, leads to more innovative solutions for confronting challenges and achieving success. People with disabilities add an important dimension to diversity, and accessible technology can ensure they're represented in your workforce, at all levels.

Increased retention

Accessible technology is a smart corporate continuity strategy. Employees who become ill or injured, or who develop age-related functional limitations, may require accessible technology to do their jobs. Their experience and institutional knowledge should be retained whenever possible, since it is far more expensive to onboard new employees than it is to keep the talent you have.

In fact, according to a report by the Job Accommodation Network (JAN), eliminating the costs of training a new employee is one of the primary benefits of ensuring existing employees with disabilities have the tools they need to maximize their productivity.

Corporate image

Accessible technology is a way to highlight and communicate your commitment to workforce diversity and equal employment opportunities for people with disabilities. 

Expanded customer base

People with disabilities represent the third largest market segment in the U.S., so by proactively employing individuals with disabilities, businesses can gain a better understanding of how to meet the needs of this important and expanding customer base.

Reduced legal costs 

Employers covered by Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act may not discriminate against individuals on the basis of disability in any aspect of employment, including recruitment. In addition, employers that contract with the federal government are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of disability under Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act and must increase their hiring of people with disabilities.

Having an accessible technology infrastructure can be a key part of delivering upon these requirements and avoiding penalties for non-compliance. It can also help streamline recruitment processes and reduce costs associated with making individual technology-related accommodations for employees—ultimately leading to increased compliance.

For a more in-depth look at the issues above, please see the featured resources presented on this page.

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Experiences in Employment Accessibility