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    The March 2014 update to Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act provides federal contractors with clear guidelines and goals for measuring the success of their efforts to meet these requirements to actively recruit, retain, and advance qualified individuals with disabilities.

    Even if you're new to the world of accessible technology, you've probably heard terms tossed around that relate to accessibility standards and regulations - like "508 compliant," "WCAG 2.0," and more. This article will demystify some of the technical standards that apply to accessibility and explain how they differ from laws and regulations. 

    On February 27, 2015, the U.S. Access Board published a proposed update to the rules implementing Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, which outlines the federal standards and guidelines for making information and communications technology (ICT) accessible to people with disabilities. The public has until May 28, 2015 to submit comments on the changes. 

    To read the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, submit comments, or review the comments others are submitting, go to www.regulations.gov and enter “Section 508” in the search box.

    Here are the top 6 questions PEATworks readers are asking about the proposed changes:

    Lainey Feingold is a nationally-recognized disability rights lawyer known for negotiating landmark accessibility agreements and pioneering the collaborative advocacy and dispute resolution method known as “Structured Negotiations.” PEAT recently spoke with Feingold about her work around digital accessibility and its impact on the employment of people with disabilities.

    Robert "Bobby" Silverstein, one of the behind-the-scenes architects of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), reflects upon how the ADA is now increasingly playing a critical role in ensuring equal employment opportunities for people with disabilities by ensuring the accessibility of information and communication technologies (ICT).

    Powers Pyles Sutter and Verville principal Bobby Silverstein details the various accessibility policies and how companies can strategize to make this part of their company culture.

    In today’s business world, eRecruiting tools are everywhere. Also known as "online recruiting," eRecruiting refers to the practice of using technology—in particular, web-based resources—to support tasks involved with finding, attracting, assessing, interviewing, and hiring new personnel.

    Deputy Secretary of Labor Chris Lu discusses his takeaways from meeting with the great Stevie Wonder and hundreds of other dedicated leading accessibility "stars" at last month's International Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference (CSUN). As he notes, "our commitment to accessible technology is about basic civil rights, as well as the collective productivity of America’s workforce...employers, technology vendors and tech users with disabilities must all work together to raise awareness and educate one another about accessible workplace technology issues, most of which can be easily solved."

    The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is seeking public comments on their proposed updates to Section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act. 

    The EEOC's April 2016 Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding its proposed updates to Section 501 includes many implications related to accessible technology and employment.

    DOJ is looking at establishing accessibility requirements for online services, programs, and activities provided to the public by state and local governments—including many employment-related tools and resources. 

    Event Date: 
    July 21, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm EDT

    Must employers make web-based employment information and services accessible to everyone, including those with disabilities? Bobby Silverstein discusses how the ADA applies to accessible workplace technology.

    When the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law in 1990, much of the technology currently used in workplace did not yet exist. In honor of the ADA's 26th anniversary, legal expert Bobby Silverstein recently sat down with PEAT for an in-depth Q&A exploring how the ADA applies to workplace ICT, and how recent settlements are impacting this issue.

    The Department of Justice is requesting approval to research the benefits of accessible web content for people who are blind—including websites and ICT that are essential in most workplaces today. These results would inform future rulemaking under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), including the ADA's application to accessible workplace technology.

    PEAT encourages public comments from stakeholders committed to accessible technology in the workplace in order to help assess the need for this research, and best practices for gathering the information. You can submit comments until August 30, 2016

    Employers and other entities covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act and Title V of the Rehabilitation Act can add the following procurement language to contracts with product vendors to enhance the accessibility of purchased or licensed products.

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was written in 1990—long before the proliferation of the Internet and today's technologies. In this recorded webinar, one of the architects of the ADA, Bobby Silverstein, discusses his perspective on the development of the ADA and its application today to accessible workplace technology.

    The ADA is a comprehensive civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability and ensures equal opportunity for persons with disabilities—including Internet Web site access, mobile applications, and other forms of ICT

    The Rehab Act is designed to safeguard the civil rights of people with disabilities, and includes many regulations related to technology.