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Images are a core aspect of most website designs today, and they can even increase the accessibility of a webpage for many users, such as employees and job seekers with cognitive and learning disabilities. Adding graphics, drawings, illustrations, graphs, and charts can benefit many users by increasing a person’s ability to understand the concepts at hand.

Writing good alternative text for website images means focusing on quality, not quantity. To ensure equal access for employees and job seekers using screen readers, you must tailor each image description on your website to the specific context it is used in. 

The National Council on Disability’s 2016 report to Congress notably recognizes accessible workplace technology as a right for all Americans and a key pathway to employment, and provides actionable recommendations for the federal government, technology industry, and private and public sectors.

This 2010 law is the source of several new regulations aimed at addressing telecommunications accessibility in the digital age.

Section 255 requires manufacturers to ensure that telecommunications equipment and services are designed, developed, and fabricated to be accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities, when it is readily achievable to do so.

The Rehab Act is designed to safeguard the civil rights of people with disabilities, and includes many regulations related to technology.

The ADA is a comprehensive civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability and ensures equal opportunity for persons with disabilities—including Internet Web site access, mobile applications, and other forms of ICT

Event Date: 
December 15, 2016 - 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm EST

Images are used on websites for many different functions, and each require a different approach for accessibility. In this webinar Gian Wild discusses how to ensure your images are both accessible and usable for people with disabilities.

 

Senior Associate Director for the White House Office of Public Engagement Maria Town joined PEAT recently for a lively conversation in celebration of National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). During this PEAT Talk, Maria shared thoughtful insights about the state of accessible workplace technology, and the current Administration’s efforts to promote its use in workplaces nationwide.

Transcript of PEAT Talks: Celebrating National Disability Employment Awareness Month with Maria Town, Senior Associate Director for the White House's Office on Public Engagement. Recording date: October 20, 2016.

A key step in ensuring an accessible workplace is to ensure that all web resources used by employees and jobseekers are accessible. And because tables are used in structuring many webpages, you’ll want to be sure that yours are correctly formatted.

Table accessibility is important to people with the following disabilities:

If you’ve got a website, you may be relying on tables to convey information. But if those tables are not created correctly, they can create a real mess for employees and job seekers trying to access the information they need, particularly people who are blind, people with low vision, and people with cognitive disabilities. To learn what makes a good table—and the pitfalls of bad ones!—please read on.

Event Date: 
November 17, 2016 - 1:00 pm to 1:30 pm EST

Jenny Lay-Flurrie, the Chief Accessibility Officer of Microsoft, shares valuable guidance on creating a workplace culture focused on access and inclusion. Learn from Jenny's insights on key strategies to encourage employees at every level to embrace and promote accessibility and take away best practices to apply to your workplace.​

Event Date: 
November 09, 2016 - 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm EST

In order to ensure that your eRecruiting materials and other website content is accessible, it’s essential that your website include properly formatted tables. In this webinar, Gian Wild of Accessibility Oz provides a hands-on demonstration of coding and sequence requirements for both data tables and layout tables, and the easy way to determine the difference between table types​