Resource Library

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When it comes to accessibility, VPATs are the most common form of information exchange between vendors and their customers. And at Elsevier, they’ve found that making these reports an organizational priority simply makes good business sense.

By weaving accessibility requirements throughout the RFP, you’ll demonstrate to the vendor that you take it seriously and are truly invested in providing accessible products/services to your users.

After reviewing the responses to your RFI, you’ll be better prepared to define the accessibility requirements for your formal procurement solicitation.

An overview of the types of solicitations you can use to achieve a successful procurement. 

Step 8 in the Buy IT! process is to review and learn from your experiences, which can occur immediately after a particular ICT purchase, or at the beginning of a procurement planning endeavor

    Best practices for managing vendor performance and relationships in the post-procurement phase

     

      Background on accessibility testing best practices for you to consider incorporating into the evaluation and validation phase of your procurement process

      Model procurement language you can use when developing and negotiating a contract with a vendor

      The section of Buy IT will help you review and grade the proposals to select a winning bidder, including help navigating the world of VPATs and ACRs.

      Sample solicitation language you can use when finalizing your RFP or RFQ.

        This section of Buy IT! offers helpful background on writing an effective solicitation that produces an accessible and usable version of the product you need.

        After scanning the marketplace for potential vendors who understand accessibility, you’ll be ready to dig deeper and connect with candidates.

        Before issuing a solicitation it is crucial to determine whether the marketplace already houses accessible versions of the products you want to buy. 

        Once you secure executive buy-in for an accessible ICT procurement program, your planning can begin.

        There are several steps to take before you buy to ensure your technology purchase is strategic, informed, and accessible to all users.

        If you don’t already have executive buy-in for your commitment to accessibility and usability, it’s time to make the case to the powers that be—whether they are top leaders in your organization, your chief information officer (CIO), or the head of procurement. 

        When it comes to fostering an ICT procurement process that prioritizes accessibility and usability, the first step is to set your procurement priorities. 

        Implementing accessible technology in your workplace means buying accessible tech in the first place. This new resource helps employers and their purchasing staff build accessibility and usability into their information and communication technology (ICT) procurement processes.

        Event Date: 
        September 21, 2017 - 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EDT

        Accessibility experts Ted Gies and Jay Nemchik discussed the business significance of VPATs, and their best practices for handling requests.

        Event Date: 
        April 20, 2017 - 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EDT

        Taleo is the leading talent management system used by HR professionals worldwide. In this webinar, Senior Director of Oracle's Accessibility Program Peter Wallack, Product Management Director of Taleo Development Ali Moosvi, and Accessibility Test Engineer Priyanka Jampana​ will discuss the challenges and successes that their team has experienced, as well as the accessibility features currently in production.

        Event Date: 
        June 16, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm EDT

        Do you post job openings on Twitter and Instagram, or use LinkedIn to vet candidates? Today, 79% of job seekers use social media to locate job opportunities. In this webinar, digital marketer Eliza Greenwood will discuss steps to ensure that your social media recruiting efforts for active and passive talent can successfully reach candidates with disabilities. ​

        As businesses compete to attract talented, skilled employees, it’s important to make sure that artificial barriers aren’t blocking their path. In this cautionary tale, Sassy Outwater explains how employers may be missing out on top candidates when their online hiring and recruiting systems aren't accessible.

        Event Date: 
        March 17, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm EDT

        Sharron Rush, co-founder and Executive Director of Knowbility, explains the importance of user testing to ensure that workplace technologies are truly accessible.

        Online hiring practices have made it increasingly easy to apply for a job—unless you’re a person with a disability, that is. Senior Web Accessibility Consultant Denis Boudreau explores the problem of why the employment rate of Americans with disabilities has continued to drop for the last 25 years, and how web designers and developers hold a key to improving the situation.

        Event Date: 
        February 18, 2016 - 2:00 pm to 2:30 pm EST

        Dan Sullivan, Vice President of Sales at AudioEye, talks about the return-on-investment for employers who embrace accessible technology that benefits all users.

        When it comes to the accessibility of web pages, web applications and web tools, most people turn to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), the internationally recognized standards developed and maintained by the World Wide Web Consortium’s (W3C) Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI). In order to help technology providers and employers understand the basics of WCAG and other related accessibility standards, PEAT spoke with the W3C's Shawn Henry, who leads their worldwide education and outreach promoting web accessibility.

        View a discussion with state accessibility CIOs Jeff Kline, Sarah Bourne, and Jay Wyant regarding Policy-Driven Adoption for Accessibility (PDAA). This new approach can help achieve higher levels of accessibility in vendor-provided products and services over the long term.

        This article explores tips for communicating about accessibility–clearly, directly, and throughout the technology development lifecycle.

        Next week’s 2015 M-Enabling Summit on June 1-2 will provide a forum for all who create and contribute to the development and implementation of accessible mobile technologies. We hope to see you there! At last year’s event, we were honored to welcome CTIA - The Wireless Association into the PEAT Network as a founding member, and are delighted to feature their guest post this month. CTIA represents the wireless communications industry, and has long provided strong leadership on mobile accessibility issues.

        No matter your industry, the technological tools we use to accomplish our work today are more advanced than the tools we used even just a few years ago, and this is especially true for people with disabilities. New technologies are fundamentally changing the workplace, and rapidly evolving technologies and workplace policies both play into a new way of doing business.

        If you're an employer about to take a leap into an accessible workplace technology effort, you might be wondering where to begin. It's a question I'm often asked by people who understand the "why" behind accessibility, but who are daunted by the "how." But getting started is actually pretty simple.

        As a senior vice president and information technology manager at Wells Fargo, I frequently received the question, "Can the company buy me a...?" Managers and team members always seemed to want the latest and greatest gadget, software application, or piece of hardware. My answer was always, "How will it make you more productive, and how will it fit into our environment?" Most of the time, the requester had no answer to these questions, so we didn't pursue things any further.

        If accessible workplace technology is your goal, you must ensure that you buy accessible technology in the first place and deploy solutions that work for all users.