Resource Library

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Dan Ellerman, Inclusion and Diversity Senior Manager at Accenture, discusses the findings from their recent white paper "Amplify Accessibility," and the hows and whys of implementing the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).

 

Sassy Outwater-Wright, Director of the Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired (MABVI), discusses why businesses should hire people with disabilities, and what it's like for jobseekers to encounter eRecruiting and HR technologies that aren't accessible.

It's important to know—and be able to prove—that your activities are having a positive effect. PEAT offers several resources to help you measure and evaluate your progress

Employers committed to diversifying their applicant pools and improving their candidate experience need to be aware of problems that applicants with disabilities may have when they try to access careers sites, job portals and electronic applications.

Larry Goldberg of Oath (formerly Yahoo) and Kate Sonka of Michigan State University discuss how the Teach Access collaborative is helping leading tech companies and universities partner to ensure that the next generation of tech developers and designers learn to think and build inclusively. 

Our team joined thousands of accessibility enthusiasts from around the globe at the annual CSUN Assistive Technology Conference last month to exchange insights about the progress of accessibility efforts in technology and business, and to learn what is in store for the future.

Find resources to get started with training staff across your organization in the accessibility skills relevant to their specific roles.

Different job roles within your company will require different training levels and skills. This article discusses some typical job roles and the accessibility training they should ideally receive.

Salimah LaForce explains how people with disabilities can help make wireless technologies more accessible by participating in the latest release of the Wireless RERC’s Survey of User Needs (SUN). First launched in 2001, this cornerstone survey provides essential data to engineers, designers, the wireless industry, and government regulators to help make wireless technology more accessible.

 

Next time you’re out and about, take a moment to notice how many people around you are wearing technology-enabled accessories. While not yet ubiquitous, wearable technology is making its way into our lives as an everyday part of our wardrobes−and for people with vision loss, such emerging technologies are providing unprecedented access to information about the world around them.

Jeff Bigham of Carnegie Mellon University discusses how computer scientists rely on crowdsourced testing to make technologies more accessible, and how the flexibility of crowd work intersects with growing opportunities in the gig economy for people with disabilities.

People with various permanent, temporary, situational, or changing disabilities access the web in different ways. Check out the following tips to ensure that everyone can use your website—regardless of whether they can manipulate a mouse, their level of vision, how many colors they can see, how much they can hear, or how they process information.

We asked employers what emerging workplace trends or technology would have the biggest impact on people with disabilities in the next 5 years. Results of our ongoing poll are available below.

Researcher Martez Mott is working to create new touch interaction techniques for mobile technologies using machine-based learning. In this episode, he explains how this emerging technology will improve workplace technology with touch screens by allowing users with a range of motor abilities to customize their touch techniques.

PEAT's 2017 Think Tank meeting explored key issues related to accessible workplace technology through working groups and rich facilitated discussions with 63 participants representing industry, government, academia, and the disability community. The event generated several tangible recommendations for closing the accessible technology skills gap, expanding government apprenticeship and workforce programs for people with disabilities, and encouraging the development of accessible products.

Here at PEAT, we spend a lot of time talking about the importance of accessible technology in the workplace. But how do we ensure that budding computer engineers and programmers have the skills they need to develop accessible tech in the first place?

Scott Wiseman and Joe Bielawski discuss how the gig economy is helping the government to staff up, push projects forward, and increase efficiency—and the opportunities this may offer to job seekers with disabilities.

Event Date: 
February 15, 2018 - 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EST

Paul Schroeder, Aira Director of Public Policy & Strategic Alliances, discusses how emerging technologies are shaping the landscape of employment for people with vision loss, and other disabilities.

Many accessibility consultants are available for hire to help build and fix accessibility issues, and to provide staff trainings.

As you build and refine your accessible technology initiative, you can find additional training resources and support for yourself and staff through the following professional development resources:

AccessU

This annual conference offers instructional courses in digital accessibility, including online sessions for remote attendees.

Any digital content your company distributes, either internally or externally, needs to be accessible. This article covers training resources for many popular workplace products.

Resources for getting started with web accessibility. While the average employee doesn’t need to know the nuts and bolts of web accessibility, you’ll want to ensure that anyone involved with the website understands how to upload accessible content.

 

The following resources explore how you can weave accessibility and inclusion into your organizational culture.

Bobby Silverstein discusses the implications of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other laws related to accessible technology with respect to shifts to a gig or project-based workforce.

What does the future hold for accessible IT? Federal and industry executives from across the technology sector recently joined PEAT, supported by the General Services Administration (GSA), to share experiences, learn from each other, and discuss the future of accessible IT.  

Jutta Treviranus, Director and Founder of the Inclusive Design Research Centre, discusses how to improve artificial intelligence systems so they can better serve everyone, including people with disabilities.

Cisco's Project Lifechanger started out as a volunteer pilot program, and is now helping to transform the company's hiring and employment programs. 

Event Date: 
June 21, 2018 - 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EDT

In recent years Facebook has become a tool for professional networking and on-the-job workplace productivity through its enterprise collaboration software, Workplace. In this webinar, Director of Accessibility Jeff Wieland and Director of Policy Monica Desai will discuss why and how Facebook has made accessibility a priority.​

Register

Event Date: 
January 18, 2018 - 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EST

Larry Goldberg of Oath and and Jeff Wieland of Facebook discuss how Teach Access is working with industry, academia, and advocacy groups to expand the quality and quantity of undergraduate programs that teach the fundamentals of accessibility.

Step 8 in the Buy IT! process is to review and learn from your experiences, which can occur immediately after a particular ICT purchase, or at the beginning of a procurement planning endeavor

    Model procurement language you can use when developing and negotiating a contract with a vendor

    Sample solicitation language you can use when finalizing your RFP or RFQ.

      This section of Buy IT! offers helpful background on writing an effective solicitation that produces an accessible and usable version of the product you need.

      Once you secure executive buy-in for an accessible ICT procurement program, your planning can begin.

      Event Date: 
      October 19, 2017 - 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EDT

      Mark Penicook explores Capital One’s efforts to integrate accessibility awareness across their internal brand and to establish enterprise-wide accessibility standards and best practices.

      Implementing accessible technology in your workplace means buying accessible tech in the first place. This new resource helps employers and their purchasing staff build accessibility and usability into their information and communication technology (ICT) procurement processes.

      Policy Matters provides policy analysis and news regarding laws and regulations, court decisions, and government resources related to the accessibility of technology used in all aspects of employment.

      The National Council on Disability’s 2016 report to Congress notably recognizes accessible workplace technology as a right for all Americans and a key pathway to employment, and provides actionable recommendations for the federal government, technology industry, and private and public sectors.

      Event Date: 
      November 17, 2016 - 1:00 pm to 1:30 pm EST

      Jenny Lay-Flurrie, the Chief Accessibility Officer of Microsoft, shares valuable guidance on creating a workplace culture focused on access and inclusion.

      As of May 2016, the Department of Justice (DOJ) entered into 171 settlement agreements addressing how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to ICT accessibility. Through these agreements, employers and other covered entities can understand DOJ priorities related to website and ICT accessibility and how to proactively comply with existing rules and guidance.

      TechCheck is a powerful but simple tool to help employers assess their technology accessibility practices and find tools to improve them.

      When growing an accessible workplace technology effort, it can be daunting to efficiently address gaps in your knowledge base. However, you don't have to do it alone. Eliza Greenwood recently attended the annual AccessU conference to improve her own skills, and reports that the opportunity to practice digital accessibility "hands on" in computer labs made a big difference.

      What's the key to understanding how accessible your products are? A good testing process.

      Of course any initiative you undertake boils down to the return on investment, and accessibility should be no exception. Thankfully, purchasing and using accessible technology—including accessible eRecruiting tools—can benefit your organization immensely. Read on to learn how...

      TalentWorks is a free online tool for employers and human resources professionals that helps them ensure their online job applications and other eRecruiting technologies are accessible to job seekers with disabilities. PEAT created the tool based on its national survey of people with disabilities, where 46% of respondents rated their last experience applying for a job online as "difficult to impossible."

      This article provides tips on accessible technology training—from basic disability awareness for all employees, to highly specialized technical training for software and application developers. 

      Newly founded last year, the International Association of Accessibility Professionals (IAAP) already has 1,700 members in 50 countries. The mission of the organization is to define, promote, and improve the accessibility profession globally through networking, education, and certification in order to enable the creation of accessible products, contents, and services. PEAT recently had a conversation with IAAP’s board president, Rob Sinclair, who also has a little day job as Microsoft’s Chief Accessibility Officer, and Chris Peck, IAAP Chief Executive Officer, to find out how they are tackling such a global endeavor.

      Headquartered in Washington, D.C., CTIAThe Wireless Association® represents the wireless communications industry and has a history of leadership on mobile accessibility issues.

      We recently spoke with CTIA's Matthew Gerst, director of state regulatory & external affairs, about CTIA's work in this area.

      Although legal requirements can sometimes feel burdensome to employers, on the accessibility front they can be very helpful. The relevant federal laws and regulations, such as "Section 508" and the "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act" (CVAA) provide helpful and detailed information about technical standards that employers can use to guide their use and procurement of technology that is accessible to all users, including people with disabilities. 

      Looking for a roadmap to ensure that the technology in your workplace is accessible to all employees and job seekers?  You've come to the right place!  This Action Steps toolkit is designed to help employers learn the what, why, and how of accessible workplace technology. 

      Once your company commits to increasing the accessibility of its workplace technology, it is smart to communicate that commitment, both internally and externally.

       
       

      Employers with strong, mature accessibility initiatives usually have support from the top—executives and other leaders who communicate their commitment to an information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure that is inclusive of people with disabilities throughout the organization.But what type of executive should spearhead your initiative? And how can you, as an internal accessibility advocate, recruit such a leader? PEAT suggests three easy action steps to get you on the right path.

      To ensure their products are accessible to the widest range of people—including people with disabilities—many technology providers implement internal initiatives focused specifically on information and communications technology (ICT) accessibility. To be successful, such an initiative must be guided by a well-rounded team of committed individuals, each bringing specific skills and resources to the table.

      Once developed, a solid, comprehensive business case can serve as an important tool in justifying your company's accessibility initiative and communicating about it, both internally and externally.