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Today, many companies are implementing “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) policies—meaning employees use their own mobile devices (laptops, tablets, and smartphones) at work to access company information and applications. When it comes to accessibility, such policies can offer advantages for both employers and technology users. But they also present some challenges.

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Measurement is an important part of ensuring an accessible technology initiative is meeting its intended goals. Metrics, both quantitative and qualitative, can help validate activities, identify where to concentrate, and communicate to internal and external stakeholders.

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Sometimes accessibility barriers are identified after a product is launched. These barriers can be documented internally, and then addressed when products are updated. Different enterprises may perform this function in different ways; some use a dedicated accessibility tool, while others add an accessibility section to a general product management tool.

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When a company adopts an accessibility initiative, whether formal or not, it is valuable to communicate that commitment, both internally and externally. Such expressions of commitment may run the gamut from statements on public-facing websites to internal training programs to participation in accessibility associations and events.

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Strong accessibility initiatives usually have support from the top—executives and other leaders who communicate their commitment to an