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As a senior vice president and information technology manager at Wells Fargo, I frequently received the question, "Can the company buy me a...?" Managers and team members always seemed to want the latest and greatest gadget, software application, or piece of hardware. My answer was always, "How will it make you more productive, and how will it fit into our environment?" Most of the time, the requester had no answer to these questions, so we didn't pursue things any further.

I’m excited to be writing this introductory blog post officially announcing the launch of PEATworks.org, an interactive online resource focused on accessible technology in the workplace. This new web portal is the result of work done over the past year by the Partnership on Employment & Accessible Technology (PEAT), a multi-faceted initiative funded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy to promote the employment of people with disabilities through the development and adoption of accessible technology.

Today, many companies are implementing “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) policies—meaning employees use their own mobile devices (laptops, tablets, and smartphones) at work to access company information and applications. When it comes to accessibility, such policies can offer advantages for both employers and technology users. But they also present some challenges.

PEAT wants to share your good ideas on this website and elsewhere, and you'll have control over how we do that, including staying anonymous. Submit your response by using the button below.

Measurement is an important part of ensuring an accessible technology initiative is meeting its intended goals. Metrics, both quantitative and qualitative, can help validate activities, identify where to concentrate, and communicate to internal and external stakeholders.

PEAT wants to share your good ideas on this website and elsewhere, and you'll have control over how we do that, including staying anonymous. Submit your response by using the button below.

Sometimes accessibility barriers are identified after a product is launched. These barriers can be documented internally, and then addressed when products are updated. Different enterprises may perform this function in different ways; some use a dedicated accessibility tool, while others add an accessibility section to a general product management tool.

PEAT wants to share your good ideas on this website and elsewhere, and you'll have control over how we do that, including staying anonymous. Submit your response by using the button below.