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The March 2014 update to Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act provides federal contractors with clear guidelines and goals for measuring the success of their efforts to meet these requirements to actively recruit, retain, and advance qualified individuals with disabilities.

Technology is essential to applying for a job, getting a job, and doing a job. And as long as it's accessible, it can be a great equalizer in ensuring that people with disabilities can obtain, retain, and advance in employment. To optimize their potential, individuals with disabilities should have a basic understanding of what accessible workplace technology is—and use this knowledge to assess and meet their own needs.

Once an organization—whether a tech provider or an employer in any industry seeking to create a more disability-inclusive workplace—has initiated an accessibility initiative, how will it know if it’s making progress? As with all corporate initiatives, goals must be established and mechanisms put in place to track progress—the results of which must then be reported to management on an ongoing basis.

One of PEAT's primary goals is to help employers understand how to ensure their information and communications (ICT) technology infrastructure is accessible to all employees—and the strong business case for doing so. Once your company commits to increasing the accessibility of its workplace technology, it is smart to communicate that commitment, both internally and externally.

PEAT's Social Media User Agreement governs all official PEAT accounts on social media platforms and websites, including, but not limited to, social networking pages, blogs, and file-sharing sites (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn). Please read this Agreement carefully. Your participation on any of PEAT's social media accounts constitutes your agreement to comply with these rules and any future revisions.