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PEAT Project Manager Corinne Weible answers the common question of “What is the difference between accessible technology and assistive technology?”

So you are interested in ensuring that your eRecruiting systems are accessible. You understand that this will widen your candidate pool and ensure you get the very best applicants for each position. So now what? We at Forum One have thought long and hard about this topic and want to share what we have learned.

If you're one of the many employers adding digital interviews to your tool chest of eRecruiting technologies, you're not alone. According to a 2015 survey conducted by Korn Ferry1 71% of employers use real-time video interviewing and 50% use video interviews as a way to narrow the candidate pool. These new breeds of job interview—conducted over the Internet, often through videoconferencing—are attractive options due to their ease and cost-effectiveness.

With proper planning and consideration, you can ensure that all job seekers are able to access and experience your recruiting videos, webcasts and live events. 

More and more employers are using social media platforms like Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter to advertise job postings and promote their companies, while job seekers are using them to network, learn about career opportunities, and apply for jobs online. But not all social media content is accessible to all people, which limits the reach and effectiveness of these platforms.

This tip sheet describes some common accessibility issues faced by people with several types of disabilities—including those affecting vision, hearing, physical, and cognitive skills. It highlights tips and exemplary practices that HR professionals can share with the technology designers and developers who are purchasing, building, modifying, and improving their eRecruiting tools, websites, and mobile applications.

Accessibility matters to people with all kinds of disabilities—not just those with vision and hearing impairments. That means individuals with intellectual and learning disabilities, cognitive issues, traumatic brain injuries, and other disabilities, all of which can make using the Internet more challenging.

Despite all of the advances in technology, employers are still having trouble filling positions. Of course, there are a number of reasons why finding talent is so difficult. But what if one of those boiled down to a fundamental problem with the technology tools employers are using? What if top talent is falling through the cracks due to accessibility issues, rather than a lack of qualifications?

Section 508WCAG? The ADA? If you're new to the topic of accessibility, you might be asking yourself which accessibility-related laws and regulations apply to you, and which accessibility standards your eRecruiting tools should follow. 

One of the most crucial ways to ensure that your eRecruiting tools are accessible is to ensure that you buy accessible technology in the first place. And if you're like most companies, you already have some of these purchases under your belt.