PEAT Blog

Vintage-style globe showing Australia.

Writing good alternative text for website images means focusing on quality, not quantity. To ensure equal access for employees and job seekers using screen readers, you must tailor each image description on your website to the specific context it is used in. 

The National Council on Disability’s 2016 report to Congress notably recognizes accessible workplace technology as a right for all Americans and a key pathway to employment, and provides actionable recommendations for the federal government, technology industry, and private and public sectors.

Senior Associate Director for the White House Office of Public Engagement Maria Town joined PEAT recently for a lively conversation in celebration of National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). During this PEAT Talk, Maria shared thoughtful insights about the state of accessible workplace technology, and the current Administration’s efforts to promote its use in workplaces nationwide.

Screenshot of a layout table providing contact information Left cell: Address: Office of Contract Administration City and County of San Francisco 1 Dr. Carlton B Goodlett Place Room 430 San Francisco, CA 94102;  Middle cell: blank; Right cell: Office Hours Monday-Friday (excluding holidays) 8:00 am to 5:00 pm  Phone/Email (415) 554-6743 oca@sfgov.org

If you’ve got a website, you may be relying on tables to convey information. But if those tables are not created correctly, they can create a real mess for employees and job seekers trying to access the information they need, particularly people who are blind, people with low vision, and people with cognitive disabilities. To learn what makes a good table—and the pitfalls of bad ones!—please read on.

Deputy Secretary of Labor Chris Lu discusses why an inclusive mindset is critical for building both productive workplaces and technology innovations—and why it's important for as many people as possible to help DOL and PEAT brainstorm ideas for advancing accessible workplace technology by participating in the national dialogue.

Today, the ability to use ICT technologies is a core element of most jobs, but many applications and websites aren't accessible to everyone. What if employees could use the access features they need anywhere, anytime, on any device? In our September PEAT Talk, Raising the Floor’s Gregg Vanderheiden revealed that this reality may be closer than you think. 

Perkins School for the Blind and Harvard Extension School have partnered to provide a free online course titled “Introduction to Inclusive Talent Acquisition” for hiring managers and recruiters.

It’s no surprise that a team effort is essential for providing accessibility professionals with a strong network of professional support, and in our August PEAT Talk, Rob Sinclair discussed how the recent merger of IAAP and G3ict will promote and support the accessibility profession on a more global scale.

When the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law in 1990, much of the technology currently used in workplace did not yet exist. In honor of the ADA's 26th anniversary, legal expert Bobby Silverstein recently sat down with PEAT for an in-depth Q&A exploring how the ADA applies to workplace ICT, and how recent settlements are impacting this issue.

When growing an accessible workplace technology effort, it can be daunting to efficiently address gaps in your knowledge base. However, you don't have to do it alone. Eliza Greenwood recently attended the annual AccessU conference to improve her own skills, and reports that the opportunity to practice digital accessibility "hands on" in computer labs made a big difference.