PEAT Blog

Leading tech companies are increasingly recognizing the potential of neurological diversity, and are launching dedicated autism hiring initiatives to attract this often overlooked talent pool.

28 years after the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), people with disabilities continue to face unequal access in digital spheres. Oath’s Larry Goldberg argues that making accessibility a central part of technology education is an essential part of the solution.

Facebook’s Director of Accessibility Jeff Wieland and Director of Global Policy Monica Desai recently joined PEAT to discuss why and how Facebook has made accessibility a priority.

Brooke Aiken details the new features and tools recently launched at Section508.gov, the federal government’s website for IT accessibility. While aimed primarily at federal employees and contractors, these tools are broadly useful for anyone seeking to ensure that the technology they are buying is accessible.

Room of students in conversation, seated in groups of 4-6 at tables

Teach Access recently drew students to Silicon Valley for their inaugural Study Away program, where students met with leading companies to learn the value of an accessible technology skill set on the job market—and how it will help them make a real impact on ALL users.

Employers committed to diversifying their applicant pools and improving their candidate experience need to be aware of problems that applicants with disabilities may have when they try to access careers sites, job portals and electronic applications.

Our team joined thousands of accessibility enthusiasts from around the globe at the annual CSUN Assistive Technology Conference last month to exchange insights about the progress of accessibility efforts in technology and business, and to learn what is in store for the future.

Salimah LaForce explains how people with disabilities can help make wireless technologies more accessible by participating in the latest release of the Wireless RERC’s Survey of User Needs (SUN). First launched in 2001, this cornerstone survey provides essential data to engineers, designers, the wireless industry, and government regulators to help make wireless technology more accessible.

 

Next time you’re out and about, take a moment to notice how many people around you are wearing technology-enabled accessories. While not yet ubiquitous, wearable technology is making its way into our lives as an everyday part of our wardrobes−and for people with vision loss, such emerging technologies are providing unprecedented access to information about the world around them.

Here at PEAT, we spend a lot of time talking about the importance of accessible technology in the workplace. But how do we ensure that budding computer engineers and programmers have the skills they need to develop accessible tech in the first place?